Debridement

Cheryl Carver's picture
wet-to-dry dressing changes using gauze

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

The big debate continues in regards to using wet-to-dry dressings. One thing that is for certain though is that this type of dressing is frowned upon in long-term care facilities per the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) Guidelines for pressure ulcers. However, long-term care facilities are put at risk for citations when using wet-to-dry dressings for any wound type.

Michel Hermans's picture
Year in review

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

At the beginning of a new year, many look back at the previous one in an attempt to analyze what happened, whether it was good or bad or perhaps even special.

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Michel Hermans's picture
scapel for debridement

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

There are a number of general rules in surgery. Among these: dead space has to be avoided. interestingly enough, there is virtually no real scientific documentation about this topic but everybody knows this to be true (in ulcers this, of course, applies to fistulae, crevices, etc.).

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Laurie Swezey's picture
wound care 101 - wound debridement

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

There are four main types of debridement: mechanical, autolytic, enzymatic, and surgical. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages. Let’s take a look at each method individually:

Michel Hermans's picture

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

In my previous blog, I mentioned the lack of innovative ways of early detection of infection in the context of not having seen a great deal of innovation at the last SAWC. Privately, I received some questions and comments about C-reactive protein as a marker.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

by Elliot Fialkoff and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

There are numerous causes for ulcerations including pressure, venous insufficiency, arterial insufficiency, and neuropathic wounds. All have very different characteristics and require very different interventions. One thing that all chronic wounds have in common is the accumulation of necrotic material, biofilm or non-viable materials secondary to a prolonged inflammatory stimulus to the wound. In order for an ulcer to heal properly this "slough" must be regularly removed from the wound base so that healthy granular tissue can develop.

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Ron Sherman's picture

by Deboshree Roy, MSC and Ron Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H

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Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Necrotic tissue that is present in a wound presents a physical impediment to healing. Simply put, wounds cannot heal when necrotic tissue is present. In this article, we'll define necrotic tissue and describe ways to effect its removal from the wound bed.

What is necrotic tissue?

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