Debridement

Laurie Swezey's picture
wound care 101 - wound debridement

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

There are four main types of debridement: mechanical, autolytic, enzymatic, and surgical. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages. Let’s take a look at each method individually:

Michel Hermans's picture

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

In my previous blog, I mentioned the lack of innovative ways of early detection of infection in the context of not having seen a great deal of innovation at the last SAWC. Privately, I received some questions and comments about C-reactive protein as a marker.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

by Elliot Fialkoff and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

There are numerous causes for ulcerations including pressure, venous insufficiency, arterial insufficiency, and neuropathic wounds. All have very different characteristics and require very different interventions. One thing that all chronic wounds have in common is the accumulation of necrotic material, biofilm or non-viable materials secondary to a prolonged inflammatory stimulus to the wound. In order for an ulcer to heal properly this "slough" must be regularly removed from the wound base so that healthy granular tissue can develop.

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Ron Sherman's picture

by Deboshree Roy, MSC and Ron Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H

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Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Necrotic tissue that is present in a wound presents a physical impediment to healing. Simply put, wounds cannot heal when necrotic tissue is present. In this article, we'll define necrotic tissue and describe ways to effect its removal from the wound bed.

What is necrotic tissue?

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Ron Sherman's picture

by Ron Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H and Lynn Wang, BA

William Shakespeare wrote: "That which we call a rose, by any other name, would smell as sweet" (Romeo and Juliet, Act 2, Scene 2). William Baer reportedly said the same thing when asked why he used the name "maggot therapy" to describe the use of fly larvae (maggots) to treat osteomyelitis and soft tissue wounds.

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Ron Sherman's picture

by Ron Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H and Lynn Wang, BA

Warning: Information ahead. Read responsibly. Consume with caution.

In this age of information technology, we all have ready access to an abundance of information and data. But not all the "facts" are true, and some of what is true might be skewed to support an author's agenda. I was reminded of this while reading the Wikipedia entry for "Maggot Therapy."

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