Dressings

Cheryl Carver's picture
Combat Medicine

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, DAPWCA, FACCWS, CLTC – Wound Educator

As a veteran of the U.S. Army, and having a grandfather who was a U.S. Army combat medic, I have always had an interest in combat wound care.

Wound care has evolved immensely throughout the years in the military arena. The treatments used as far back as the fifth century B.C. were inconceivable. Examples are keeping wounds dry, wound irrigation with water and wine, burning oil into infected wounds, and topicals such as egg yolks, rose oil, and turpentine applied to the wound bed. Odor was controlled with bags of lavender at the soldier’s bedside.

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Marta Ostler's picture
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Wound Dressing Selection Facts and Questions

By Marta Ostler, PT, CWS, CLT, DAPWCA

On June 28, 2018, I presented a webinar on the topic of wound dressing selection as part of WoundSource's Practice Accelerator series on Wound Dressings 101. Choosing an appropriate wound dressing for your patient can be a difficult task; however, understanding this important step in the wound healing cascade is integral to maintaining and achieving healing outcomes for our patients with chronic and acute wounds.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University

Chronic wounds are seen mainly in those individuals that are already patients (not healthy individuals). Ischemia involves lowered blood supply to the wound which decreases the amount of oxygen available to help the healing process. Peripheral vascular disease commonly causes Ischemia as well as Diabetes melllitus, renal failure, hypertension, and inflammatory diseases. Collagen dressings give structural support and promote granulation tissue formation. Proteolytic enzymes degrade ECM proteins (a major constituent of dermal ECM) thus slowing or stopping wound healing. Modified collagen gel (MCG) is used in the study to test its effects on wound angiogenesis with the porcine model of chronic ischemic wounds.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Alginate: Highly absorptive, non-occlusive dressing derived from brown seaweed or kelp.

Antimicrobial dressing: Delivers a sustained release of antimicrobial agents to the wound, to eradicate bioburden.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Socioeconomic Considerations When Choosing a Wound Dressing

by the WoundSource Editors

As wound care clinicians, we need to take into consideration many different factors in deciding on a treatment plan for our wound patients. Our patients should be evaluated on an individual basis. If we look at our patient’s socioeconomic status, we will find it varies from patient to patient Socioeconomic status clearly affects morbidity and mortality rates related to wounds. Wound management tends to be lower in quality and follow-up visits tend to be fewer in number when compared with patients with better economic status.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Wound Dressing Selection

by the WoundSource Editors

Do you, as a wound care clinician, know the ingredients of the dressings you are using on your patients? Do you know brand names, or do you know dressing categories? There are over 6,000 dressings, and we as clinicians cannot possibly learn about every dressing. However, learning the categories of dressings, along with indications, can help simplify the puzzle. You first want to ask yourself what you are trying to do. Absorb exudate or donate moisture? Is there a biofilm contained in the wound? Is there a formulation or composition of the dressing that would work best?

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Wound Dressing Selection

by the WoundSource Editors

Selecting advanced wound care dressings is most effective when looking at the “whole” patient. If you are focusing only on the “hole” in the patient, you may not be enhancing the wound healing process as much as you had anticipated. In fact, you may be causing more harm to the wound without realizing it. Remember to always involve your patients in their treatment care plan, if possible. Your patients do not always share what is going on at home or economically. Let’s walk through a couple of case scenarios that may help you think outside the box when choosing a treatment plan for your patient.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Wound Dressing Selection

by the WoundSource Editors

Dressing selections can be overwhelming for clinicians and providers in health care. There are now well over 6,000 wound care products on the market. Ideally, there would be a multifunctional smart dressing that could “do it all” readily available in all settings. Unfortunately, we as health care providers know, that definitely isn’t the case.

Industry News's picture

Forth Worth, Texas – April 26, 2018 – SteadMed Medical, a leading provider of acute and chronic wound care products, announces it has developed a new wrap with their core Drawtex Hydroconductive Dressing Technology that assists in the management of edema.

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Margaret Heale's picture
home care nurse with patient

By Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

I watched a short PowerPoint DVD on the "bag technique" as part of our regular in-servicing the other day. The presentation started with the most important way to prevent cross infection—wash hands—which is fine. Then came the bag technique. I have no problem with the fundamentals of keeping your bag off the floor, only getting anything out of it after decontaminating your hands, and wiping before you store. I do have a problem with having to place the bag on a Chux or water-resistant wipeable or disposable surface, however.

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