Incontinence Management

Margaret Heale's picture
Continence Assessment

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Not very long ago, when working in an in-patient rehab center, I was shocked to discover patients calling the adult incontinence garments "hospital underwear." We were making good inroads into reducing the use of these products with the hope that if we used less it would be possible to acquire higher-quality products that would function optimally for patients who really needed them. It was of concern that some facilities had become diaper-free because many of our patients benefited from briefs, particularly as a "just in case security blanket" and we felt it was unrealistic for our patient population to be brief-free.

Holly Hovan's picture
Wound Care Certification

Holly M. Hovan MSN, RN-BC, APRN-CNS, CWOCN-AP

Not many people wake up one day and say, "Wow, I really want to be a continence nurse!" In fact, sometimes people don't even really understand what a continence nurse is, their role, or the specialty in general. I often tell nurses that although we may not all hold certification, every nurse should be a continence nurse, especially in the long-term care setting.

Janet Wolfson's picture
A Multidisciplinary Approach to Incontinence

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

My current job as wound coordinator has pulled me into the world of incontinence and the many disciplines that care for people challenged by this disorder. I was previously acquainted with the therapy side as I worked with therapists certified in pelvic floor therapy. My work with venous edema acquainted me with medications that caused continence-challenged people to resort to absorbent adult briefs. As I work more closely with physicians, I am more familiar with medications to support weakened or sensitive pelvic muscles and nerves. On the nursing side, I have researched support surfaces, incontinence pads, and barrier creams. I see patients and occupational therapists working together to regain continence independence through problem-solving mobility issues.

Holly Hovan's picture
Causes of Incontinence

by Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

With World Continence Week upon us, it is an appropriate time to discuss some types and causes along with treatment of urinary incontinence. Incontinence can have a significant impact on patient quality-of-life and skin health, subjects that will also be discussed.

WoundSource Editors's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

As many as one-quarter to one-third of adults are living with incontinence. Risk factors include: age, obesity, childbirth, and prostate enlargement. Not being able to control leaking urine is embarrassing and can even cause people to limit daily activities and prevent them from enjoying life. Here are some ways medical professionals can support patients living with incontinence.

Industry News's picture

Expansion of Sensi-Care® portfolio in $500m market for skin care wipes, providing customers with advanced, evidence-based1 solutions to cleanse, moisturize and protect patients' skin

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Margaret Heale's picture
open door

Perspective of Nursing Care from Past to Future by Matron Marley

by Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

People can be open with few secrets and little to hide but even then there are behaviors, memories, hopes, fears and desires that are not revealed. We have a right to be in control of this part of ourselves and the flesh that encompasses it. Such control is part of the freedom we covet as a nation.

Karen Zulkowski's picture
Skin Conditions

by Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

I previously discussed the need for a complete head-to-toe skin assessment. Certainly this can tell you whether or not the person is dehydrated, has open or discolored areas, and many other things about their overall health. Color, for example, can give you clues to additional problems such as vitamin and mineral deficiencies that can show on the skin.

Margaret Heale's picture

Perspective of Nursing Care from Past to Future by Matron Marley

by Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Well it's me again, Matron Marley. I got in through the door no problem today. My granddaughter dropped me off as she is doing some MDS training. I am feeling more comfortable as a volunteer now that I have visited a few times. When talking to the staff about their wanderer last time I was here and being reminded about the first recliner butt I saw, I wanted to drop back to the past again and tell you why I was so concerned.