Multidisciplinary Team

Jeffrey M. Levine's picture

Jeffrey M. Levine, MD, AGSF

I was asked to perform a wound consult on a newly admitted resident to a post-acute unit of a nursing home. She rested quietly with a barely touched breakfast on her bedside table. Her aide had tried to feed her, but she accepted only small spoonfuls of oatmeal and a sip of orange juice. She came to our facility after a long hospitalization for COVID-19–related complications, including pneumonia, kidney failure, and septic shock that required pressor agents. While in the ICU on a ventilator, she developed a pressure injury. At 86 years old, her transfer papers revealed feeding tube refusal and a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Chronic and complex wounds present a formidable challenge in health care. Nonhealing wounds impact approximately 1% of the world's population yet account for more than 2% to 4% of health care expenses. Wounds that require additional clinical efforts often include those that are chronic and resistant to therapy, those with increased risk, and those that reduce the patient's quality of life.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Angiogenesis: The process of new blood vessel formation. This process is required for wound healing and allows for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the body’s tissues.

Cellular and tissue-based therapies: Advanced therapies that may use cells to induce immunomodulation in the wound bed and facilitate healing by resolving inflammation. Such modalities may include stem cells, scaffolds, skin substitutes, and epidermal substitutes, among others.

Edematous: A term to describe wounds that are affected with edema or are abnormally swollen.

Blog Category: 
Christine Miller's picture

Christine Miller, DPM, PhD

The role of nutrition in wound healing has been heavily explored since the early part of the 20th century. Addressing the proper balance of both macronutrients and micronutrients is a crucial part of the systemic treatment plan for patients with chronic wounds. Nutrition professionals are often highly valued members of any multidisciplinary healing team. There can often be adverse consequences of malnutrition, such as compromised immune systems and increases in hospital readmission rates. As modern-day clinicians with access to advanced therapies, we may think that adding nutrient supplementation to a care regimen is a contemporary concept, but in reality it is steeped in history.

Alex M. Aningalan's picture

Alex M. Aningalan, MSN, RN, CWON, WCC

Chronic wound conditions are prevalent across health care systems globally and often result in economic and humanistic burdens on clinicians and patients.1 Moreover, pressure injuries, among of the more common types of chronic wounds, affect an estimated 2.5 million people in the United States annually, resulting in a staggering 60,000 preventable deaths.2 In addition, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service reported that the United States spends about $9.1 to $11.6 billion annually as payment for the burden imposed by pressure injuries.2