Necrotic Wounds

Cheryl Carver's picture
Skin and Wound Management with Substance Abuse

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, DAPWCA, FACCWS, CLTC – Wound Educator

The challenges for all clinicians associated with substance abuse and addiction are at an all-time high. We are seeing more and more overdoses and skin and wound issues. There needs to be less judgment and more education. Not every person with substance abuse issues is addicted due to a poor choice. Reasons for abuse can be related to unmanaged mental illness, self-medication and family genetics, to name a few. Compassion is lacking for this group of folks. I have seen it firsthand. This topic hits close to home as I have a son in recovery. This problem is an epidemic and needs to be talked about more. I live in Ohio, and we are one of the top five states for heroin and methamphetamine (meth) abuse.

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Laurie Swezey's picture
wound care 101 - wound debridement

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

There are four main types of debridement: mechanical, autolytic, enzymatic, and surgical. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages. Let’s take a look at each method individually:

Lydia Meyers's picture
black widow spider

by Lydia A. Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

In the times that I have worked with amazing hospitals and doctors, I have learned and gathered information on the differences between two types of necrotizing infections that happen in the world of wound care. Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) and spider bites can present as similar in nature and need immediate intervention.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

by Elliot Fialkoff and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

There are numerous causes for ulcerations including pressure, venous insufficiency, arterial insufficiency, and neuropathic wounds. All have very different characteristics and require very different interventions. One thing that all chronic wounds have in common is the accumulation of necrotic material, biofilm or non-viable materials secondary to a prolonged inflammatory stimulus to the wound. In order for an ulcer to heal properly this "slough" must be regularly removed from the wound base so that healthy granular tissue can develop.

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Bruce Ruben's picture

Part 4 in a series on infection management
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

by Bruce E. Ruben MD

Before you can delve into the vicious and deadly world of necrotizing fasciitis, the ghastly "flesh-eating disease" that's been widely reported by the media, you have to understand something about the bacteria that causes it and who is most susceptible to this rare condition.

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Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Necrotic tissue that is present in a wound presents a physical impediment to healing. Simply put, wounds cannot heal when necrotic tissue is present. In this article, we'll define necrotic tissue and describe ways to effect its removal from the wound bed.

What is necrotic tissue?

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Ron Sherman's picture

by Ron Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H

Over 80 years ago, Dr. William Baer — then Chair of Orthopedic Surgery at Johns Hopkins — observed that wounds debrided with maggot therapy healed at least as well and as fast as any surgically debrided wound; but wounds that continued to receive maggot therapy beyond the point of debridement would heal even faster than normal. What evidence of that do we have today?

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