Nutritional Assessment

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Nutrition Management

By Heidi Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

"Defendants failed to provide adequate nutrition to prevent plaintiff from suffering severe malnutrition and weight loss. This allowed the development of a severe pressure ulcer, numerous infections, and dehydration and malnutrition. Had defendants provided proper care, the pressure ulcer, infections, and malnutrition and dehydration would not have occurred."

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By Heidi Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

In the previous blog, I briefly went through the standards of care when it comes to nutrition and pressure injury (PI) prevention and development and discussed what a large role nutrition plays in PI litigation. Here are several instances: Punitive damages of $92 million, later lowered to $11,855,000, were imposed where malnutrition and dehydration were proven against a nursing home. A dietary manager for a nursing home told state surveyors that her nursing home had "dropped the ball" on a resident's nutrition needs when that resident had lost 17 pounds in 75 days; a $1,385,000 settlement was reached. Malnutrition with a loss of 27% of body weight in 15 months led to a $380,000 settlement just before trial. Shocking, isn't it? It literally "pays" to pay attention to nutrition standards of care.

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By Heidi Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

Pressure injury risk and development are multifactorial, individualized processes. Each patient presents with a unique set of circumstances and needs. In looking at charts for attorneys to determine whether standards of care related to pressure injuries have been met, key elements include turning and positioning measures, support surfaces, mobility, proper and timely assessment of risk factors and wounds, physician communication and notifications, communication with family, proper wound treatments, and nutrition assessment and measures.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
Nutrition and medicine

By Mary Ellen Posthauer, RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The World Union Wound Healing Society (WUWHS) held their 2016 meeting in historic Florence, Italy in September. The initial meeting of the WUWHS was held in Australia in 2000 and is convened every four years. I have had the unique opportunity to present in Paris, Toronto, Yokohama and this year in Florence on the topic of nutrition and wound healing. 4,226 clinicians attended the conference including 525 from the US. The convention center was a modern venue surrounded by the ancient walls of the Roman fortress.

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health care quality measures

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014 (IMPACT) amends Title XVIII of the Social Security Act by adding a new section –Standardized Post-Acute Care (PAC) Assessment Data for Quality, Payment, and Discharge Planning. The goal of the IMPACT Act is to reform PAC payments and reimbursement while ensuring continued beneficiary access to the most appropriate setting of care. The act requires the submission of standardized and interoperable PAC assessment and quality measurement data by Long-Term Care Hospitals (LTCH), Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNF), Home Health Agencies (HHA) and Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities (IRF).

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Nutrition and wound healing

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Congratulations to Bruce Ruben, MD, for his #1 WoundSource blog for 2015; Wound Healing: Reasons Wounds Will Not Heal. I certainly concur with Dr. Ruben that inadequate nutrition is an often-overlooked reason for delayed wound healing.

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Nutrition and protein intake

By Bruce E. Ruben MD

A day doesn't go by that I'm not bombarded with information on the newest diet, the latest exercise trend or the fastest way to get in shape. My email inbox opens with message subjects like "click here to drop 10 pounds fast" or "how to get a Kardashian body without surgery." I overhear women at a local breakfast haunt order egg whites instead of whole eggs, because they contain less fat and they are worried about gaining weight. How about the latest craze of ordering sandwiches wrapped in lettuce because everyone is afraid of the dreaded carbohydrates? Our culture is so focused on losing weight, getting in shape, and looking like the latest model on the cover of Vogue or GQ that we have lost sight of what is healthy.

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hand wound

By Bruce E. Ruben MD

A non-healing wound is generally defined as a wound that will not heal within four weeks. If a wound does not heal within this usual time period, the cause is usually found in underlying conditions that have either gone unnoticed or untreated. In general, there are five reasons why wounds will not heal and more than one of these conditions can be operating at the same time.

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medical records

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

As Dr. Aletha Tippett noted in her December blog, following wound documentation standards can help clinicians avoid legal issues. Pressure ulcer litigation often involves pressure ulcers and weight loss.

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Image from the National Cancer Institute

By the WoundSource Editors

A myriad of factors need to be addressed when evaluating a patient with a wound. A thorough patient history, including previous wounds, surgeries, hospitalizations, and past and existing conditions will help guide your clinical assessment, in addition to a number of questions specific to the wound(s) being assessed. Following is a list of general questions to ask when evaluating a wound care patient. (Please note that this list is not comprehensive and is intended only to serve as a guide):