Nutritional Management

Cheryl Carver's picture
Combat Medicine

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, DAPWCA, FACCWS, CLTC – Wound Educator

As a veteran of the U.S. Army, and having a grandfather who was a U.S. Army combat medic, I have always had an interest in combat wound care.

Wound care has evolved immensely throughout the years in the military arena. The treatments used as far back as the fifth century B.C. were inconceivable. Examples are keeping wounds dry, wound irrigation with water and wine, burning oil into infected wounds, and topicals such as egg yolks, rose oil, and turpentine applied to the wound bed. Odor was controlled with bags of lavender at the soldier’s bedside.

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Nancy Munoz's picture
Nutrition Management

by Dr. Nancy Munoz, DCN, MHA, RDN, FAND

The presence of diabetes can contribute to a decreased wound healing rate. Increased glucose levels can stiffen the arteries and contribute to narrowing of the blood vessels. This can contribute to pressure injury development and is a risk factor for impaired wound healing.

Diabetes is an illness in which the individual’s blood glucose level is above the established range. Glucose is present in the foods we eat. Most foods contain a blend of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. The amount of each of these nutrients in the foods we consume determines how quickly the body transforms food into glucose. For instance, consuming carbohydrates affects blood glucose levels one to two hours after the meal. Ingesting protein has very little influence on blood glucose levels, and the glucose from the fat in foods is slowly absorbed and does not contribute to increase glucose levels.

Nancy Munoz's picture
Nutrition and Protein

by Nancy Munoz, DCN, MHA, RDN, FAND

The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) defines a pressure injury as localized damage to the skin and/or underlying soft tissue, usually over a bony prominence or related to a medical or other device. The injury can manifest as intact skin or an open ulcer and may be painful. The injury occurs as a result of intense and/or prolonged pressure, occasionally in combination with shear. The tolerance of soft tissue for pressure and shear may also be affected by microclimate, nutrition, perfusion, comorbidities, and the condition of the soft tissue.

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Nancy Munoz's picture
malnutrition and pressure injuries

by Nancy Munoz, DCN, MHA, RDN, FAND

Nutrition is a major determinant of health status. Food, as a vital source of nutrition, not only is essential to physiological well-being, but also impacts one's quality of life culturally, socially and psychologically.

Janet Wolfson's picture
Neck Surgery

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Recovery and treatment of the head and neck cancer or head trauma patient goes beyond the surgery. Modifications in diet, adapted ADL, instruction in self-MLD, and taking precautions to heart are essential components of recovery. Some patients may need compression garments to deal with the lymphedema.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
Nutrition and medicine

by Mary Ellen Posthauer, RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The World Union Wound Healing Society (WUWHS) held their 2016 meeting in historic Florence, Italy in September. The initial meeting of the WUWHS was held in Australia in 2000 and is convened every four years. I have had the unique opportunity to present in Paris, Toronto, Yokohama and this year in Florence on the topic of nutrition and wound healing.

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
Risk factors for pressure injuries, medical nutrition therapy intervention

by Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) should be an integral part of your pressure Injury (ulcer) management plan. Malnutrition/undernutrition is a risk factor for pressure injury formation and prolongs the healing process.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
chemical formula of arginine, an amino acid

by Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Clinicians continue to question if oral or tube feedings formulated with arginine hasten wound healing time versus standard high calorie, high protein supplements. There is an increase in the number of studies that examine the role of arginine in combination with other nutrients to facilitate pressure injury healing. Many of the studies were conducted in Europe or Australia using products that are not always marketed in the United States. However, very similar products are available.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
nutritional supplements for healing wounds

by Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Several nutrients, such as arginine, zinc, vitamin A, vitamin E and vitamin C, play a key role in wound healing and preserving tissue viability. However, while current research doesn’t confirm consuming mega doses of any of these minerals or vitamins, there are studies supporting combining adequate amounts of these nutrients in an oral nutritional supplement to facilitate wound healing.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
lean body mass

by Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Recently, I attended a webinar that focused on dietary protein and preserving lean muscle mass. There is a wealth of research on this topic in particular as it relates to older adults and protecting muscle health during inactivity. Dr. Robert Demling noted the effect of lean body mass (LBM) loss on wound healing.

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