Nutritional Management

Emily Greenstein's picture
Wound Care Resolutions

By Emily Greenstein, APRN, CNP, CWON, FACCWS

The New Year is finally here, the beginning of a new decade. And we all know that with the calendar change comes the urge to get rid of any and all bad habits. Time to start over, wipe the slate clean, and transform into something amazing. Except, in reality it never seems to happen that way. We may start out well and then fall off the wagon and back into old habits.

Fabiola Jimenez's picture
Nutrition Management

Fabiola Jimenez, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

While I was providing foot care to a patient, one of my coworkers overheard me advising the patient that she will need a lot more protein to heal her wound, and some changes to her diet will be necessary and therefore tighter control of her blood glucose and improved hemoglobin A1c. Later, I was approached by a coworker who told me: "Because you are not a Registered Dietitian, you cannot discuss dietary needs with the patient." I disagree.

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Nancy Munoz's picture
Arginine

by Nancy Munoz, DCN, MHA, RDN, FAND

Pressure injuries (pressure ulcers) claim over 60,000 lives and affect over 2.5 million Americans each year. The US health care system spends $9.1–11.6 billion annually in the treatment of pressure injuries. Aside from the financial cost, pressure injury is a devastating health concern that affects quality of life and well-being.

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Emily Greenstein's picture
Wound Care

by Emily Greenstein, APRN, CNP, CWON, FACCWS

"When I grow up, I want to be a wound care specialist." That's not something you hear kids going around saying. Sure, kids want to be doctors or nurses. But wound care specialist?

When you think about it, being a wound specialist is not a glamorous position, unlike being a neurosurgeon. The best quote that I ever heard from a colleague of mine was, "No one wants to do wound care; wound care isn't sexy." This may be true, but what is wound care then? To me it is ever changing, it is learning new things (most of which are not found in text books), and it is about helping patients heal both emotionally and physically from a chronic condition.

Cheryl Carver's picture
Combat Medicine

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, DAPWCA, FACCWS, CLTC – Wound Educator

As a veteran of the U.S. Army, and having a grandfather who was a U.S. Army combat medic, I have always had an interest in combat wound care. Wound care has evolved immensely throughout the years in the military arena. The treatments used as far back as the fifth century B.C. were inconceivable. Examples are keeping wounds dry, wound irrigation with water and wine, burning oil into infected wounds, and topicals such as egg yolks, rose oil, and turpentine applied to the wound bed. Odor was controlled with bags of lavender at the soldier’s bedside.

Nancy Munoz's picture
Nutrition Management

by Dr. Nancy Munoz, DCN, MHA, RDN, FAND

The presence of diabetes can have a negative impact on wound healing rates. Increased glucose levels can stiffen the arteries and contribute to narrowing of the blood vessels. This can influence pressure injury development and is a risk factor for impaired wound healing.

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Nancy Munoz's picture
malnutrition and pressure injuries

by Nancy Munoz, DCN, MHA, RDN, FAND

Editor's note:This blog post is part of the WoundSource Trending Topics series, bringing you insight into the latest clinical issues and advancement in wound management, with contributions by the WoundSource Editorial Advisory Board.

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Holly Hovan's picture
patient mobility and activity

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

The Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk® category of activity focuses on how much (or how little) the resident can move independently. A resident can score from 1 to 4 in this category, 1 being bedfast and 4 being no real limitations. It is important to keep in mind that residents who are chairfast or bedfast are almost always at risk for skin breakdown

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