Nutritional Management

Holly Hovan's picture
enteral nutrition feeding

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

A common misconception by nurses is sometimes predicting nutritional status based on a resident's weight. Weight is not always a good predictor of nutritional status. Nutritional status is determined by many factors and by looking at the big picture.

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Janet Wolfson's picture
Neck Surgery

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

The Inpatient Rehab Facility where I currently work as the Wound Coordinator is a discharge site for a major medical center with an excellent Head and Neck Cancer program, as well as a Trauma Center. This has resulted in a handful (or more) of patients with complex facial and neck reconstruction each year. These people present special needs beyond just healing incisions.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
Nutrition and medicine

By Mary Ellen Posthauer, RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The World Union Wound Healing Society (WUWHS) held their 2016 meeting in historic Florence, Italy in September. The initial meeting of the WUWHS was held in Australia in 2000 and is convened every four years. I have had the unique opportunity to present in Paris, Toronto, Yokohama and this year in Florence on the topic of nutrition and wound healing. 4,226 clinicians attended the conference including 525 from the US. The convention center was a modern venue surrounded by the ancient walls of the Roman fortress.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
factors affecting healing in chronic wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

Whether due to injury or surgery, wound healing normally progresses steadily through an orderly set of stages. Wounds that don't heal within 30 days are considered chronic. Wounds that become chronic generally stall in one or more of the phases of wound healing. Here are 10 of the most common factors affecting wound healing in chronic wounds:

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
Risk factors for pressure injuries, medical nutrition therapy intervention

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) should be an integral part of your pressure Injury (ulcer) management plan. Malnutrition/undernutrition is a risk factor for pressure injury formation and prolongs the healing process. Since nutrition is one component of both the treatment and prevention plan (along with dressings, treatments and support surfaces), having a written MNT protocol assists the interdisciplinary team in achieving a positive outcome for the individual/patient. The collaborative, interdisciplinary approach should include the individual and their family/caregiver.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
chemical formula of arginine, an amino acid

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Clinicians continue to question if oral or tube feedings formulated with arginine hasten wound healing time versus standard high calorie, high protein supplements. There is an increase in the number of studies that examine the role of arginine in combination with other nutrients to facilitate pressure injury healing. Many of the studies were conducted in Europe or Australia using products that are not always marketed in the United States. However, very similar products are available.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
nutritional supplements for healing wounds

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Several nutrients, such as arginine, zinc, vitamin A, vitamin E and vitamin C, play a key role in wound healing and preserving tissue viability. However, while current research doesn’t confirm consuming mega doses of any of these minerals or vitamins, there are studies supporting combining adequate amounts of these nutrients in an oral nutritional supplement to facilitate wound healing.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
lean body mass

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Recently, I attended a webinar that focused on dietary protein and preserving lean muscle mass. There is a wealth of research on this topic, in particular, as it relates to older adults and protecting muscle health during inactivity. Dr. Robert Demling noted the effect of lean body mass (LBM) loss on wound healing. Healing a wound requires increased calories to prevent the body from breaking down protein (LBM) for energy, thus depleting protein stores required for protein synthesis and healing. Lean body mass is metabolically active, transports protein throughout the body and is essential for survival as it contains all of the skeletal and smooth muscles and immune cells. Healthy adults lose between 3-8% of LBM per decade and after age 70 muscle loss increases to 15% per decade. This loss of LBM or sarcopenia is an age-related, insidious loss of lean muscle mass accelerated by physical inactivity and poor nutrition.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
nutrition and health care clinicians

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics annually designates March as National Nutrition Month and the theme this year is Savor the Flavor of Eating Right. My blog usually focuses on what we as caregivers can do to improve the nutrition of our clients/patients with wounds. However, how often do you as a busy wound care clinician think about your nutrition or what you are eating or probably not eating?

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
protecting hearts and healing wounds through nutrition

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

February is American Heart Month and Valentine’s Day is celebrated around the world on the 14th. So what is the connection between protecting your heart, enjoying candy and flowers with those you love on Valentine’s Day, and wound care? Many of your clients with wounds also have some type of heart disease or have elevated lipid levels. These clients need nutritional strategies for wound healing that also protects their hearts.

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