Nutritional Management

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

The new year has begun. Many of us have made resolutions with the best of intentions. Exercise more, lose weight, eat healthy foods, keep blood sugar in a healthy range, stop smoking and using smokeless tobacco, watch less television. The list goes on and on. I am no stranger to not keeping my New Year's resolutions beyond a month or two. The best way to keep a resolution is to make it realistic. Make your goals achievable. Don't resolve to run a marathon if you cannot walk around the block. Rather than vowing to lose 50 pounds, set a goal of 10. Once you have lost 10 pounds resolve to lose another 10 and so on.

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Michael Miller's picture

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY, PT. 18

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA, WCC

One of the problems with writing a blog is not the lack of material on which to vent, vex or vociferate. Rather, I deal with the much desired situation in which there are simply so many aberrancies that appear before my now trifocaled vista, that I have to decide which of many potential entities to offend.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

My first year in practice, I volunteered with the local dietetic association when they launched “Dial a Dietitian”. The goal of the program was to capture the attention of the community and encourage people to phone a dietitian and seek help to solve their nutritional problems.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

Part 1 in a series discussing the challenges and opportunities in patient/family education

By Paula Erwin-Toth, MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

Mr. Gillan is a 72 year old man with venous insufficiency. He presents with a venous ulcer on his left lower leg. He has several co-morbid conditions including hypertension, cataracts, and osteoarthritis which includes his hands. His primary caregiver is his 74 year old wife who suffers from diabetes and mild dementia. They do not have any family living nearby. He is being discharged to his home with a primary wound dressing and compression wraps. His discharge instructions include requests for Home Care nursing and follow up with vascular medicine and a pedorthist.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer, RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Fat-soluble vitamins A, E, and K dissolve in fat and are transported in the body attached to lipids and require pancreatic enzymes and bile for absorption. They are stored in the liver and fatty tissue, which is why an excess concentration of fat-soluble vitamins can be toxic. When blood concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins decline, the body simply retrieves them from storage. Individuals with pancreatic insufficiency, cirrhosis or malabsorption syndrome may have low concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins. Consuming sources of fat-soluble vitamins daily is not necessary, but average intake of these vitamins consumed over time is beneficial. The impact of these fat-soluble vitamins in the management of wounds and other conditions will be discussed.

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY, PT. 11

I have always had a penchant for the ironic. I love a great joke well told, an amusing anecdote well written or a cartoon well drawn. Charles Addams, creator of the Addams family in the New Yorker magazine introduced his “unusual” family by drawing them poised several stories above and looking down upon a group of happy, singing Christmas carolers as they prepared to pour boiling oil on them. I still chuckle when I think about it. I love unusual sayings such as “You have a firm grasp of the obvious”, “You may not be good, but at least you’re slow” or “I can’t see the forest because of the trees.”

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Last month I discussed the importance of implementing a system for screening the nutritional status of individuals. When the screening tool triggers nutrition, timely referral is critical. Each facility should establish the appropriate time frame for completion of a nutrition assessment. For example, is 24 hours appropriate in acute care and seven days in a skilled nursing facility? Establish a time frame appropriate for your facility and adhere to it.

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Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

The responses that I have been getting from the blogs are terrific! It is wonderful to know that clinicians are interested, questioning, and wanting to know what is in products. So, now in 2012, we continue this blog with the topic of products and practice.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
Nutritional Supplements

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The protein in the food we eat supplies the body with the amino acids necessary to make its own protein. There are certain amino acids that the body cannot produce, and some that are unable to be made fast enough to meet the body’s needs. The nine amino acids that must be supplied from the protein in foods are called “essential” or “indispensable” amino acids.

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