Patient Accessibility

Alton R. Johnson Jr.'s picture

By Alton R. Johnson Jr., DPM

It all started with a phone call at close to midnight on a Saturday night from my physician’s phoneline app. It was an established wound care patient calling me to state that his negative pressure therapy device went awry. He was requesting advice to resolve the issue. Out of these growing concerns, he stated that if there was no solution, he would be immediately reporting to our hospital emergency room, which was not his preference in such a situation. In response, I simply informed the patient it was safe to turn off the device and that I would make a home visit to him at 5 o’clock the next morning. With a sigh of relief, he agreed to the plan.

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Holly Hovan's picture
Discharge Planning

Holly M. Hovan MSN, RN-BC, APRN, CWOCN-AP

You might notice the hospital halls seem a little quieter around the holidays, the unit census may be down, and patients may be asking about their discharge plans. The holidays can be a time when patients want to be home (when they're able to).

Cathy Wogamon's picture
Telehealth

By Cathy Wogamon, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, CWON, CFCN

Wound care has evolved into a massive specialty service in the past few decades, with new treatment modalities, advances in care, and thousands of wound care products. On the forefront of advancements in technology and wound care is a new way to provide care to the patient: telehealth.

Ivy Razmus's picture
Wheelchairs and Pressure Injuries

By Ivy Razmus, RN, PhD, CWOCN

People in wheelchairs are limited in their mobility, sensory perception, and activity. These limitations can lead to increased temperature and moisture on the areas that are in contact with the wheelchair surface. These risk factors place wheelchair users at a higher risk for pressure injuries. A pressure injury is localized damage to the skin and underlying soft tissue, usually over a bony prominence or related to a medical or other device. Pressure from medical devices against the skin may also cause pressure injury. Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and its associated comorbidities are among the highest-risk population for developing pressure injuries. The incidence of pressure ulcers in patients with SCI is 25%–66%.

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Margaret Heale's picture
Home Health Nurse

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

"Must Love Dogs (Cats, Lizards, Snakes, Birds, AND Arachnids)." This is a line that needs to be next to all job advertisements for home health care staff. You see, I am a dog lover, not because I love dogs but because I have a way of being able to adapt in order to survive. I work in home care as a clinical nurse specialist and have slowly learned to love dogs ever since I was reported to my manager for mentioning I didn't like them much. Shortly after this I was told not to visit a patient whose cat I had shooed away from my wound dressing field. While discussing this with a colleague, she told me of the bird that had landed on her head that morning just as she was probing the patient's foot wound with a Q-tip. Maybe everybody has had experiences like mine, but maybe not, so I would like to put mine to paper to entertain you in this season of good cheer.

Cheryl Carver's picture
Telemedicine Wound Care

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Let's be frank: wound care telemedicine cannot replace a visit to a physician's office or the wound care center. Telemedicine was primarily developed to reduce visits and help serve people living in rural communities. However, telemedicine can supplement advanced wound care in many ways, and has been proven to be time saving and effective. Telemedicine in wound care has its pros and cons (like anything else), but with a protocol-driven approach, it is effective for wound healing.

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Janet Wolfson's picture
evaluating medical information resources

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

It is hard to read a newspaper (my preferred news source) or an online news site without discovering false information. I recently read an NPR article about how to vet news yourself and how to recognize this.1 The vulnerability I felt made me think about protecting my decisions from this reporting and even more, how I can help my patients weed out fake reports.

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Thomas Serena's picture
digging a grave site

By Thomas E. Serena MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

Fans of folk singer John Prine will recognize the homey lyrics describing his views on organ donation. Sitting at my desk a few weeks ago with John Prine twanging in my headphones, I began to slog through the new Noridan Local Coverage Determination (LCD) on hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). It should not have come as a surprise that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is planning prepayment review for HBOT services. We have been struggling for months in New Jersey, Michigan and Illinois with preauthorization. What is frightening is that a large number of the denials we have seen are completely nonsensical, bureaucratically driven, and dangerous: a patient with osteoradionecrosis of the jaw, for example, was denied because she didn't have 30 days of standard of care; or perhaps the CMS keyword search engine selected out a proscribed adjective!

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Diana Gallagher's picture
wound care deserts

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

Last month, the news shared two important stories that were closely linked. Walmart announced the closing of 102 Walmart Express stores as part of their overall restructuring and statistical analyses revealed the states with the highest levels of obesity. These two stories prompted discussions about food deserts and their tie to obesity.

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