Product Selection

Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Compression therapy is the “gold standard” for the treatment of venous ulcers. However, compression therapy is not a one-size-fits-all treatment and the clinician must decide on the right type of compression therapy for the individual client in order to prevent complications from occurring, such as ischemia and necrosis.

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Lydia Corum's picture

By Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

I am a Certified Wound Care Nurse (CWCN) and received my Certification with the Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse Association (WOCN). I will not say one certification is better than another, just do your homework and find one that challenges your knowledge. When I was working in the Wound Care Center, I started classes and education journey toward my certification. I had been working in Home Health Care as a wound care nurse and psychiatric nurse. This knowledge and experience gives me a different view of patients and wound care.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

"Our food should be our medicine and our medicine should be our food."
-Hippocrates

This statement by Hippocrates rings true today as hospitals, rehabilitation centers and nursing homes strive to improve the quality of their meals. The day of “bland, cold, tasteless hospital food with limp vegetables and hard, dry meat” should be distant memory. When the meals and supplements served are not consumed, poor intake often results in weight loss and inadequate consumption of calories required for pressure ulcer prevention and healing.

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Sue Hull's picture

Part 1 in a series examining the reduction of facility costs and the continuation of quality care

By Sue Hull MSN, RN, CWOCN

Remember W. Edwards Deming? We all learned about him in business management, right? He taught and demonstrated that systematic approaches were necessary to improve quality and control costs. Maybe I’m the only one, but I couldn’t really grasp how that principle could be applied to wound care.

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Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

There are more than 3,000 types of wound dressings available on the market today, and more are being launched every day. Although there are a number of protocols and algorithms available to help with the selection of wound dressings,1,2 and individual facilities are likely to have their own dressings of choice, the decision can still seem overwhelming. Even the most seasoned wound care practitioner can find it difficult to assess the advantages and disadvantages of each dressing available and to make the appropriate choice for a particular patient. Rather than consider each dressing in isolation, a useful technique can be to mentally place each type of dressing on a continuum of occlusion.3

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY, PT. 9

One of the most obvious things about being a health care professional is that our goal is to help people get better. The concepts of an ill patient saying to me, "Dr. Miller, I don't want to get better or worse, can you do something to keep me in this condition?" Seems ludicrous and more, improbable. I could not imagine any health care professional being successful if patients remained in the exact same condition weeks after treatment. As I have said in previous blogs, I recognize that while there are many variations on the definition of "better", I think it's safe to say that "better" means improved in some way, shape, or form.

Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

The responses that I have been getting from the blogs are terrific! It is wonderful to know that clinicians are interested, questioning, and wanting to know what is in products. So, now in 2012, we continue this blog with the topic of products and practice.

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Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

In follow up to comments and additional considerations of products, ingredients, and clinical practice, it is important to discuss several aspects of the topic. This blog has served thus far as a primer for the evolution of products both on the market today and currently under development.

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 4

I willingly confess that I enjoy being a maverick. Of course, at age 52 with two cats, a wonderful wife of 27 years, and two daughters (this order in no way implies favoritism), that term seems to be a bit of a stretch. As a wound care clinician and scientist, I am always on the lookout to find that new innovative dressing, technique, or technology that will help my patients just a little bit more than the next guy. I believe the trade term for my type of psychosis is called “Early Adopter.” I prefer to think of myself in terms of the little kid we all knew who had to have the newest toy first.

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