Venous Ulcers

WoundSource Editors's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Before the mid-1990s, venous disorders and disease were classified almost solely on clinical appearance, which failed to achieve diagnostic precision or reproducible treatment results. In response to this, the American Venous Forum developed a classification system in 1994, which was revised in 2004. This classification system has gained widespread acceptance across the clinical and medical research communities, and most published papers now use all or part of the CEAP system (defined in the next section). This system was once again updated in 2020.

M. Mark Melin's picture
Phlebolymphedema

M. Mark Melin, MD, FACS, RPVI, FACCWS

Understanding that February is venous leg ulcer (VLU) month, we would be remiss to exclude a consideration of the critically important role played by the lymphatic system. As such, I want to highlight the work of Dr. Tom O'Donnell in a recent editorial written on this subject.

Blog Category: 
WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

The venous leg ulcer (VLU) is the most common type of chronic leg wound, and it can be challenging to manage. VLUs account for up to 90% of all chronic leg ulcers. Proper diagnosis and treatment planning are key to wound healing outcomes. This fact is particularly true for older adults, who have an annual VLU prevalence of 1.7%.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

The most common type of chronic lower extremity wound is the venous ulcer, affecting 1% to 3% of the U.S. population. Chronic venous ulcers significantly impact quality of life and are a financial burden for both the patient and the health care system. In the United States, 10% to 35% of adults have chronic venous insufficiency, and 4% of adults 65 years old or older have venous ulcers. Identifying signs of venous disease early on while implementing surgical intervention, if warranted, can increase healing outcomes and decrease the recurrence of venous ulcers. Treatment of venous ulcers can include exercise, leg elevation, dressings, advanced wound care such as cellular and tissue-based products, compression therapy, medications, venous ablation, and surgical intervention.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Venous ulcers are known to be complex and costly. There is an array of evidence-based treatment options available to help formulate a comprehensive treatment plan toward wound closure. Health care professionals should utilize treatment options while encompassing a holistic approach to venous ulcer management. Involving the patient and/or caregiver in developing a treatment plan will increase the chances of successful wound healing outcomes. Wound closure is the primary goal of a treatment plan; however, preventing recurrence and infection should be considered just as important.

Blog Category: 
WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Venous ulcers pose a worldwide problem that comes with high recurrence rates, risk of infection, and substantial costs to treat. Health care professionals must be knowledgeable about underlying causes and pathological features. The comorbidities that are often associated with venous ulcers contribute to these lesions and prolong healing times, which in return can cause further complications. Venous disease and venous hypertension are lifelong conditions requiring lifelong management. The vicious cycle of venous reflux and obstruction associated with chronic venous disease leads to ulceration(s). Management of venous ulcers requires comprehensive wound care and compression therapy for life.

WoundSource Editors's picture
Ulcerative Wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

Ulcers in the lower extremities are more common in patients older than 65. Ulcerative wound types include venous, arterial, diabetic neuropathic, and pressure. To identify ulcer types, these wounds should be examined thoroughly for their distinct characteristics such as location and shape, as well as in conjunction with other patient information, to ensure an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan.

Blog Category: 
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Velcro devices for Venous Ulcers

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Article Title: Review of Adjustable Velcro Wrap Devices for Venous Ulceration
Authors: Stather PW, Petty C, Howar AQ
Journal: Int Wound J. 2019 Mar 21 [Epub ahead of print].
Reviewed by: Olivia Hammond, class of 2020, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Blog Category: 
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Keywords: 
Temple University

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Article Title: A Randomized Trial of Early Endovenous Ablation in Venous Ulceration
Authors: Gohel, Manjit; Heatly, Francine; Liu, Xinxue; Bradbury, Andrew; Bulbulia, Richard; Cullum, Nicky; Epstein, David; Nyamekye, Isaac; Poskitt, Keith; Renton, Sophie; Warwick, Jane; Davies, Alun
Journal: N Engl J Med
Reviewed by: Kyle Miller, Class of 2020, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Blog Category: 
Karen Bauer's picture
Venous Leg Ulcer

by Karen Bauer , NP-C, CWS

In my recent WoundSource webinar on management strategies of venous leg ulcers (VLU), I discussed the complex pathophysiology of VLUs and procedural interventions that can help them reach closure.

Blog Category: