Braden Scale

Heidi Cross's picture
Turning and Positioning

by Heidi H. Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

Failure to T&P (turn and position) is always part and parcel of a pressure ulcer lawsuit and a key element of a complaint related to pressure ulcers, as illustrated in the opening quotation. T&P documentation is a dominant focus in chart analysis and is usually one of the first things that an attorney and the expert witness look for. If T&P documentation is satisfactory, the defendant is likely to prevail; if not, then the plaintiff may have a pretty rock-solid case. But as I have opined in previous blogs, is there such a thing as perfect documentation? Alas...NO! (Or at least, rarely.)

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
wound care and legal issues

by Aletha Tippett MD

Medical providers, and especially wound care providers, seem to always be under the looming shadow of lawsuits and legal issues. I have written about this before, but it continues to be an issue as I receive requests for legal reviews repeatedly. I have read many charts for legal reviews, and it actually is very straightforward to avoid or mitigate any legal problems.

Holly Hovan's picture
patient repositioning

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

Friction and shear… what’s the difference and how do they cause pressure injuries? Are wounds caused by friction and shear classified as pressure injuries? What’s the easiest way to explain the differences between these critical components of the Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk® that are not always understood? How do I know if my patient is at risk?

Holly Hovan's picture
patient mobility and activity

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

The Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk® category of activity focuses on how much (or how little) the resident can move independently. A resident can score from 1 to 4 in this category, 1 being bedfast and 4 being no real limitations. It is important to keep in mind that residents who are chairfast or bedfast are almost always at risk for skin breakdown

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Holly Hovan's picture
enteral nutrition feeding

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

A common misconception by nurses is sometimes predicting nutritional status based on a resident's weight. Weight is not always a good predictor of nutritional status. Nutritional status is determined by many factors and by looking at the big picture.

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Holly Hovan's picture
Moisture on Skin

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

When nurses hear the term moisture, they usually almost always think of urinary or fecal incontinence, or both. There are actually several other reasons why a patient could be moist. Continued moisture breaks down the skin, especially when the pH of the aggravating agent is lower (urine, stomach contents—think fistula, stool). When there is too much moisture in contact with our skin for too long, we become vulnerable to this moisture, and our skin breaks down. Increased moisture places a patient at risk for a pressure injury as the skin is already in a fragile state.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Braden Scale

By Aletha Tippett MD

I was recently asked to speak on best practices for prevention of pressure ulcers for a group of state surveyors. This is an excellent subject and here is how I would address it:

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Since we are fast approaching the deadline for the national elections, I decided to join the fray and campaign for accurate completion of the Braden Scale nutrition sub-score. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Minimum Data Set (MDS) 3.0 Section M, Skin Conditions requires pressure ulcer risk assessment. Nursing facilities may use a formal assessment instrument such as the Braden or Norton tool to determine pressure ulcer risk. The most commonly used pressure ulcer assessment tool is the Braden Scale and one of the sub-scales is nutrition. Studies completed by Bergstrom and Braden in skilled nursing facilities found that 80% of pressure ulcers developed in two weeks after admission and 90% within three weeks of admission.

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