Hydrogel Dressings

Emily Greenstein's picture

By Emily Greenstein, APRN, CNP, CWON, FACCWS

Last month I introduced you to the concept of how being a wound care professional is often a lot like being a detective. This blog post is going to start our “cases.” I decided, in keeping with the theme, to write it up similar to what you would see in a court document.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Venous leg ulcerations (VLUs) are a common and often chronic pathology, and these wounds diminish the quality of life and increase the financial burden for affected patients. A recent article estimates that up to 3% of the U.S. population suffer from VLUs. A venous leg ulcer can be severely painful and may decrease a patient’s quality of life by affecting sleep, mobility, activities of daily living, and even result in social isolation. A 1994 paper proposed that approximately 65% of patients felt financially affected by a VLU, and this number is likely to have increased as a result of rising healthcare costs. The prevalence and chronic nature of the venous leg ulceration has motivated physicians to research novel techniques to heal ulcers successfully and in a timely manner.
Acellular dermal matrices have been utilized to treat diabetic foot ulcers with favorable outcomes.4 This study investigated the efficacy of a specific acellular dermal matrix for VLUs.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Preventing Wound Chronicity

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound chronicity is defined as any wound that is physiologically impaired due to a disruption in the wound healing cascade: 1) hemostasis, 2) inflammation, 3) proliferation, and 4) maturation/remodeling. To effectively manage chronic wounds, we must understand the normal healing process and wound bed preparation (WBP). Wound chronicity can occur due to impaired angiogenesis, innervation, or cellular migration. The presence of biofilm and infection are the most common causes of delayed healing.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Moisture Management

by the WoundSource Editors

Before embarking on the journey of wound bed preparation, the goals for wound care should be carefully considered. A realistic look at the goals and expectations from the perspective of the patient as well as the wound care team is the first step in developing and implementing the appropriate plan of care.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Alginate: Highly absorptive, non-occlusive dressing derived from brown seaweed or kelp.

Antimicrobial dressing: Delivers a sustained release of antimicrobial agents to the wound, to eradicate bioburden.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Wound Dressing Selection

by the WoundSource Editors

Dressing selections can be overwhelming for clinicians and providers in health care. There are now well over 6,000 wound care products on the market. Ideally, there would be a multifunctional smart dressing that could “do it all” readily available in all settings. Unfortunately, we as health care providers know, that definitely isn’t the case.

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Jeffrey M. Levine's picture
wound care product ingredients

By Jeffrey Levine MD

While I’m on rounds with students I like to ask, "What is the active ingredient of hydrogel?" My query is usually met with puzzled looks. It's a trick question, because the term "active ingredient" generally applies to pharmacologic agents that undergo metabolic change in biologic systems. The active ingredient of hydrogel which gives this substance its name is water. Compounds are added to thicken the mixture and provide viscosity, such as glycerine. Other ingredients common in cosmetics, such as aloe vera, methyl paraben, hydrogenated castor oil, and propyl paraben, are added to hydrogel depending on the manufacturer.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
heart

By Aletha Tippett MD

In a previous blog I told about the heartbreak of limb salvage when one of your patients was swooped out of your care and had an amputation. The patient I mentioned did have an amputation—a guillotine amputation just above the ankle. She stated she had become very sick and her foot was infected. Now what happens with this patient?

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

What is palliative care relative to wound treatment? In short, it is about humanity, caring and compassion. Today I saw a 90 year-old woman in a nursing home. She had hip and ankle fractures, and developed a sacral ulcer in the hospital. She was in excruciating pain, screaming at every touch. To correct her turned-in hips, she was trussed up in a hip abductor device – she called this “the dragon” – that was both uncomfortable and painful.

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