Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis

First Quality Products's picture

By: M. Sanantonio RN, C. Gunner RN, S. Trousaant LVN, M. Moore LVN

It is important for skilled nursing facilities to utilize quality incontinent products for their residents that are facing the daily challenges of both bladder and bowel incontinence. However, products alone do not make for a successful continence management program. It is imperative that the caregivers receive education in multiple areas that ultimately have an effect on the resident’s quality of life, quality outcomes and overall facility cost efficiencies. This study demonstrates the combination of quality incontinent products and education and its overall effectiveness in skilled nursing facilities.

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Margaret Heale's picture
Continence Assessment

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Not very long ago, when working in an in-patient rehab center, I was shocked to discover patients calling the adult incontinence garments "hospital underwear." We were making good inroads into reducing the use of these products with the hope that if we used less it would be possible to acquire higher-quality products that would function optimally for patients who really needed them. It was of concern that some facilities had become diaper-free because many of our patients benefited from briefs, particularly as a "just in case security blanket" and we felt it was unrealistic for our patient population to be brief-free.

Holly Hovan's picture
Causes of Incontinence

by Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

With World Continence Week upon us, it is an appropriate time to discuss some types and causes along with treatment of urinary incontinence. Incontinence can have a significant impact on patient quality-of-life and skin health, subjects that will also be discussed.

Susan Cleveland's picture
Moisture-Associated Skin Damage Prevention

by Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

Part 2 in a two-part series looking at the basics of preventing and managing moisture-associated skin damage in the long-term care setting. For Part 1, click here.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
moisture-associated skin damage

by the WoundSource Editors

It has long been known in clinical practice that long-term exposure of the skin to moisture is harmful and can lead to extensive skin breakdown. The term moisture-associated skin damage was coined as an umbrella term to describe the spectrum of skin damage that can occur over time and under various circumstances. To have a moisture-associated skin condition, there must be moisture that comes in contact with that skin.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
incontinence-associate dermatitis prevention

by the WoundSource Editors

Although clinical practice is hampered by a lack of rigorous studies, standardized terminology, or definitions of incontinence-associated skin damage, it is well known among health care providers that this damage places patients at increased risk for pressure ulcer/injury development. The worldwide challenge represented by incontinence-associated skin damage prompted the development of a global expert panel on the topic in 2014. The group, chaired by Professor Dimitri Beeckman, a leading authority on the topic, collaborated to develop international best practice guidelines for prevention and treatment of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) that were published in 2015.1

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
complications associated with MASD

by the WoundSource Editors

Best practice in skin care focuses on the prevention of skin breakdown and the treatment of persons with altered skin integrity. When we ask what causes skin damage we should consider the conditions that can harm the skin, including excessive moisture and overhydration, altered pH of the skin, the presence of fecal enzymes and pathogens, and characteristics of incontinence such as the volume and frequency of the output and whether the output is urine, feces, or both. If left untreated or not treated appropriately, moisture-associated skin damage or MASD can lead to further complications such as Candida infections, bacterial overgrowth, pressure injuries, and medical adhesive-related skin injury (MARSI). These can occur individually or overlap, which can make them even more difficult to manage. Today our focus is to discuss each of these complications of MASD in more detail and address some of the most common issues leading to their development.

Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Being an independent wound care education consultant in long-term care, I get a lot of questions regarding moisture-associated skin damage (MASD). Is it MASD or a pressure ulcer? When do I change it from MASD to pressure ulcer in my documentation?