Nutrition Management

Ryan Cummings's picture

By Ryan Cummings, FNP, CWS

Appropriately balanced nutrition is a cornerstone of high-quality wound care, and this isn’t a new revelation. Nearly all modern wound centers include some version of nutritional screening, along with ever-expanding recommendations regarding overall protein intake, complex carbohydrate needs, and micronutrient supplementation as clinical evidence for these is presented.

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The Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders's picture

By Catherine D’Andrea, RDN, LDN, and Marcia Nusgart, RPh

Malnutrition is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, especially among older hospitalized adults, yet it often goes undiagnosed and therefore untreated. It has been established that malnourished hospitalized patients experience slower wound healing, higher risks of infection, and longer length of stay. Malnutrition is a burdensome condition associated with a 34% higher cost for a hospital stay compared with a non-malnourished patient. Sufficient macronutrients (carbohydrates, protein, fats, and water) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) are vital for the body to support tissue integrity and prevent breakdown. Research supports that weight loss and difficulties with eating can increase the incidence of pressure injuries.

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Holly Hovan's picture
Pressure Injury Prevention Carnival

By Holly Hovan MSN, RN-BC, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

Education is key in sustained positive outcomes and it is the first step in understanding pressure injury prevention, for both patients and staff. It's very difficult to hold people accountable for something that they did not know. Therefore, prevention starts with education. For education to be impactful, it should also be fun. Interactive games, small prizes or candy, and engaged and energetic educators are key to fostering an environment where people will remember what they are taught. The teach-back method and continued follow-up and reinforcement are also essential elements of a successful education plan.

Ivy Razmus's picture
Age and Pressure Injury

By Ivy Razmus, RN, PhD, CWOCN

The very old and the very young are more alike than you might think when you consider risk for skin injuries. They are alike regarding their limited sensory perception, mobility, and activity. They are also alike in their potential for inadequate nutrition and their skin's supporting structures (muscle, collagen and elastin). These similarities place them at greater risk for pressure injuries.