Physical Therapy

Janet Wolfson's picture
wound infection treatment using alternative modalities

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

As I was commuting in to work a few Saturdays ago, I listened to The People’s Pharmacy on NPR. The topic was non-pharmacological treatment of infection, so being a wound care professional, I immediately started thinking of the ways I treat wound infections. In addition to oral, topical or IV antibiotics, as a PT there are modalities available to me to treat wound infections. The advantage of using these modalities is that treatments are effective across a broad spectrum of bacteria without the risk of resistance. Really! These treatments include ultrasound, electrical stimulation and laser or light-emitting diode (LED) therapy.

Janet Wolfson's picture
total knee replacement surgical wound healing

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

If you read my last blog on therapeutic interventions to stimulate wound healing, then you may recall the asset that a lymphedema trained therapist can be to your wound care department. A recent patient at the inpatient rehab facility where I am currently the Wound Care Coordinator illustrates this wonderfully.

Blog Category: 
Janet Wolfson's picture
electrical stimulation therapy in wound healing

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

I know we have all had those patients with diagnoses that impair their wounds forming granulation tissue to fill wound depth. Perhaps there are comorbidities such as diabetes, peripheral artery disease or malnutrition. Skin flaps, cellular and/or tissue-based products for wounds, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy are alternatives, but not every patient can tolerate surgery or a hyperbaric chamber, has a shallow enough wound or enough arterial supply to make these other options successful.

Janet Wolfson's picture
Keywords: 
the role of physical therapy in wound care

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

A story was related to me from someone living in a rural part of the US. A family member was in need of ongoing wound care. They were referred to a specialist who was of all things… a physical therapist! This is a response with which I am quite familiar. I have been referred to by a number of "titles" including Wound Coordinator, Wound Specialist, 'Skin Lady', and Wound Nurse, to name a few. If you scan my byline, I do have a good alphabet soup following my name, but to many, "PT" is a surprise.