Practice Management

Janet Wolfson's picture
A Multidisciplinary Approach to Incontinence

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

My current job as wound coordinator has pulled me into the world of incontinence and the many disciplines that care for people challenged by this disorder. I was previously acquainted with the therapy side as I worked with therapists certified in pelvic floor therapy. My work with venous edema acquainted me with medications that caused continence-challenged people to resort to absorbent adult briefs. As I work more closely with physicians, I am more familiar with medications to support weakened or sensitive pelvic muscles and nerves. On the nursing side, I have researched support surfaces, incontinence pads, and barrier creams. I see patients and occupational therapists working together to regain continence independence through problem-solving mobility issues.

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
Preventing Caregiver Burnout

Paula Erwin Toth, RN, MSN, FAAN
WOC nurse

November is National Family Caregiver Month. Family caregivers are the unsung heroes of the health care team. Without their loving care, hard work, and dedication our health care delivery system would crash and burn. They are the ones continuing our plans of care in the home. They are the nurse, physician, physical therapist, nursing assistant, home health aide, counselor, and social worker all rolled into one. They are expected to grasp complex care techniques that years ago were carried out only in the hospital.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
Telemedicine Wound Care

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Let's be frank: wound care telemedicine cannot replace a visit to a physician's office or the wound care center. Telemedicine was primarily developed to reduce visits and help serve people living in rural communities. However, telemedicine can supplement advanced wound care in many ways, and has been proven to be time saving and effective. Telemedicine in wound care has its pros and cons (like anything else), but with a protocol-driven approach, it is effective for wound healing.

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Terri Kolenich's picture
self-care for nurses

By Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

We have all heard time and time again how important it is to take care of yourself first so you can take better care of others. It is impossible to give something you do not have. Nurses, by nature and training, care for others before caring for themselves. Taking care of yourself should be as important to you as caring for your patients. This life lesson is clearly presented by flight attendants before every take off. Let me explain.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
high touch patient care

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

My last blog discussed the need to be high touch in a high-tech environment. This generated a lot of discussion among readers. Everyone agreed 'high touch' is important, but wondered what can we do to actually create that environment in all clinical settings?

Cheryl Carver's picture
medical documentation

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

In my role as a consultant and educator, I thought it would be interesting to acquire a handful of perspectives from wound care providers who work in the long-term care arena, and explore their responses.

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Ron Sherman's picture
perspective

By Ron Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H

Several months back, I suggested that we could better understand our patients' actions (for example, why patients do not adhere to their treatment plans) by looking at the situation from the patient's perspective. What I failed to discuss – largely because it is a topic worthy of its own discussion – is the fact that one of the best ways we can see the world from someone else's perspective is to ask that person to share their view with us.

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Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

As a traveling wound care educator for physicians, I am observing many changes within the state survey process for long-term care. Wound care physicians working in long-term care are feeling the same anxiety that facility leaders and staff members are, as the time nears the window for an annual state survey.

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