Pressure Ulcer Prevention

Margaret Heale's picture
Details

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

In our point, click, fill-in-the -blanks world of ever increasing wound care algorithms and MOs, I have an ax to grind (straight into my so-called smart phone if I had the courage).

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Cheryl Carver's picture
Terminology

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

It is 2018, and health care professionals around the world are still debating what to call skin damage. I totally immersed myself in wound care because of losing my 47-year-old mother to what was then called "decubitus ulcers." I was young when my mother died, and I wanted to know why and how this could happen. My perspective is different from that of most clinicians because of my personal experience.

Holly Hovan's picture
Interdisciplinary Journal Club

By Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

Wound, ostomy, continence (WOC) nurses wear many hats. A significant role that we play is that of an educator, both with our patients and with our staff. I'm sure we've all heard "How on earth did you ever get interested in wounds? What made you want to be a wound specialist?" or similar comments. There are so many specialties in nursing, so why this one? For me, it is about helping others.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Palliative Care

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure Injury/Ulcer Risk Management in Palliative Care and Hospice

Palliative care and hospice care are not the same, but they both share one goal. They both focus on a patient's physical, mental, social, and spiritual needs. Palliative care can begin at diagnosis and treatment or for patients at any stage of their illness. Patients may not want to receive aggressive treatment of non-healing wounds because of underlying diseases, pain, and/or cost.1

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Cathy Wogamon's picture
Veteran with Spinal Cord Injury

By Cathy Wogamon, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, CWON, CFCN

Immobility and decreased sensation can cause major problems related to the skin in the patient with spinal cord injury. Even though the average age of the veteran with a spinal cord injury is increasing, there are still many younger veterans affected by spinal cord injuries. When skin issues arise in this population, the impact is not only physical but also emotional as skin issues sometimes make it difficult for the veteran to remain in their chairs, thereby decreasing mobility and socialization.