Wound Assessment

Lindsay Andronaco's picture
surgical wound bandage and drainage

By Lindsay D. Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Wound exudate and how to properly assess and manage it has been a long standing clinical challenge in wound care. Assessing the exudate color, odor, volume, viscosity, and if it is causing maceration of the periwound skin are all important to note when creating a care plan for the patient. If there is not proper management of the exudate, then the high protease levels and low growth factor levels will negatively impact wound healing time.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
WoundSource journal club blog

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
wound care literature review club

By Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Janet Wolfson's picture
the role of physical therapy in wound care

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

A story was related to me from someone living in a rural part of the US. A family member was in need of ongoing wound care. They were referred to a specialist who was of all things… a physical therapist! This is a response with which I am quite familiar. I have been referred to by a number of "titles" including Wound Coordinator, Wound Specialist, 'Skin Lady', and Wound Nurse, to name a few. If you scan my byline, I do have a good alphabet soup following my name, but to many, "PT" is a surprise.

Cheryl Carver's picture
eschar on heel pressure ulcer

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Knowing the difference between a scab and eschar may not seem like a big deal. However, if you are being audited, or your facility is in survey, you might think otherwise. Here are a couple of scenarios for you to think about.

Terri Kolenich's picture
frequently asked wound care treatment questions

By Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

I travel to several states educating wound care providers and nurses in the long-term care setting. Many of the questions I get are the same whether I'm on the east or west coast. The one question that I encounter the most often during wound rounds or an education session is: "How do I know which treatment to use for this wound?"

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Michel Hermans's picture
monitoring the healing time of partial-thickness burns

By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

Recently I paid a visit to one of the better known wound care centers in the North East. As I expected, treatment of the common lesions seen in this center, such as venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers, was top notch. The use of compression and offloading, proper wound debridement and modern dressings (including, where indicated, biologics and matrices), in combination with the option for vascular, plastic and orthopedic (i.e. for Charcot foot) reconstruction resulted in good healing results, with high percentages of reepithelialization within a relatively short time frame.

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
Wound Management Technology

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

What's the best approach to wound management: use of the latest advanced technology or "back to basics" treatment methods? How many times have you, the experienced wound clinician, been asked this question? It is only natural for people (especially patients and their families) to gravitate to a solution that seems to offer a quick fix for a very complex problem.

Margaret Heale's picture
nurse transporting patient in wheelchair

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

It has become quite easy to look at pressure ulcer prevention in most health care settings. From acute care, through the ED and on to the OR and ITU, then to the various floors of med surg, orthopedic, not forgetting rehab and community nursing. Pediatric and neonatal units have better defined pressure ulcer risk assessment tools to utilize that have made assessment and planning care much less haphazard for those patients than in the past.

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Laurie Swezey's picture
Wound Assessment Tools

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

There are many tools that can be used to assess wounds. It is important to be aware of these tools and what they measure. It is also important to become knowledgeable about the tool(s) used in your workplace.