Wound Assessment

Cheryl Carver's picture
long-term care wound education

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

I tell everyone that long-term care is the toughest arena for a wound consultant. However, it can also be the most rewarding. The focus of this month's blog is to give you an inside look of what really goes on in nursing homes versus other health care settings.

Blog Category: 
Martin Vera's picture
barriers to wound healing

By Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

We hear this all too often, but it is so true: it takes a village to heal a wound. A village that's on the same page, with a thorough understanding of gaining progress and obtaining positive outcomes for the patient and removing the barriers to wound healing.

Cheryl Carver's picture
Telemedicine Wound Care

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Let's be frank: wound care telemedicine cannot replace a visit to a physician's office or the wound care center. Telemedicine was primarily developed to reduce visits and help serve people living in rural communities. However, telemedicine can supplement advanced wound care in many ways, and has been proven to be time saving and effective. Telemedicine in wound care has its pros and cons (like anything else), but with a protocol-driven approach, it is effective for wound healing.

Blog Category: 
Aletha Tippett MD's picture
arterial and vascular disease

By Aletha Tippett MD

This week I saw a patient with terminal peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Seeing him reminded me of how often the severity of this disease is misunderstood. He had had amputation of the toes on his right foot due to gangrene. The toes on his left foot had early gangrenous changes, similar to what had happened on his right. Of course, amputation of the toes did not solve his problem, it just moved the gangrene up further. He now has a gangrenous wound at the amputation site. Also, he has a new gangrenous round ulcer on his lateral foot. This came from tape which had been used to fasten a dressing to his foot.

Janet Wolfson's picture
evaluating medical information resources

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

It is hard to read a newspaper (my preferred news source) or an online news site without discovering false information. I recently read an NPR article about how to vet news yourself and how to recognize this.1 The vulnerability I felt made me think about protecting my decisions from this reporting and even more, how I can help my patients weed out fake reports.

Blog Category: 
Samantha Kuplicki's picture
surgical site infection prevention

By Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, AGCNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most common hospital-acquired infections, accounting for 20% of total documented infections each year and costing approximately $34,000 per episode. SSIs are responsible for increased readmission rates, length of stay, reoperation, patient morbidity and mortality, as well as increased overall health care costs.

WoundSource Editors's picture
signs of wound infection

A break in the skin through injury or surgery creates an open entry for bacteria to enter the body and begin to multiply. Recognizing the first signs of wound infection enables health care professionals to intervene with treatment swiftly. Here are some of the most common signs and symptoms associated with a wound infection:

Martin Vera's picture
wound healing and wound bed preparation

By Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

Wound bed preparation has become the gold standard model for proper wound assessment. It allows us clinicians to identify and breakdown local barriers to wound healing. Throughout our health care careers, we have seen it over and over again: the collective emphasis on standards of care, evidence-based practice, and cost-effectiveness in order to achieve positive outcomes for our patients.The wound bed preparation model supports all of these aspects of care delivery.

Catherine Milne's picture
do the right thing

By Catherine T. Milne, APRN, MSN, BC-ANP, CWOCN-AP

From Nike's "Just Do It" ad campaign to Google's corporate "Don't be evil" code, I've always been struck by the many marketing campaigns that remind us to pay attention to our conscience. A similar focus should apply to health care. In 2000, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published a scathing report showing that the number of people who died from medical errors surpassed the combined total of those who died from breast cancer and car accidents.1 To make matters worse, this was likely a low estimate. In 2013, the Journal of Patient Safety reported that adverse events from preventable harm may affect between 210,000 and 440,000 hospital patients each year.2 As clinicians, we've all taken an oath, a pledge or a vow to "do no harm." Why is the reality so far from the ideal?

Cheryl Carver's picture
Stage 1 Pressure Injury - Darkly Pigmented Skin

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

I have worked all over the country as an educator. The same gaps in education arise everywhere. A few years ago, I began teaching skin color awareness as part of my course curriculum. I feel strongly about it being a part of my inservices and course education. Understanding skin color as it relates to assessment is critical in the prevention of pressure injuries.