Wound Assessment

Margaret Heale's picture
Standardized Documentation

by Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

Wound care can be so straightforward. The process starts with a comprehensive assessment, and then the wound care regimen can be planned and the frequency of dressing changes determined. A well-written order will include all of the relevant components of a wound care regimen listed below:

Cheryl Carver's picture
Combat Medicine

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, DAPWCA, FACCWS, CLTC – Wound Educator

As a veteran of the U.S. Army, and having a grandfather who was a U.S. Army combat medic, I have always had an interest in combat wound care. Wound care has evolved immensely throughout the years in the military arena. The treatments used as far back as the fifth century B.C. were inconceivable. Examples are keeping wounds dry, wound irrigation with water and wine, burning oil into infected wounds, and topicals such as egg yolks, rose oil, and turpentine applied to the wound bed. Odor was controlled with bags of lavender at the soldier’s bedside.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Wound Tissue

by the WoundSource Editors

Successful utilization of the TIME model for wound bed preparation requires a working knowledge of chronic wound tissue types. In addition, building on this foundational knowledge is the development of accurate wound assessment skills. These components combined will assist the clinician in implementing the appropriate interventions for each wound.

Viable Chronic Wound Tissue Types

The term "viable" describes vascular tissue with dynamic biological activity.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Moisture Management

by the WoundSource Editors

Before embarking on the journey of wound bed preparation, the goals for wound care should be carefully considered. A realistic look at the goals and expectations from the perspective of the patient as well as the wound care team is the first step in developing and implementing the appropriate plan of care.

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Martin Vera's picture
Biopsy of Atypical Wound

By Martin Vera, LVN, CWS

Part 2 in a series discussing the etiology, assessment and management of atypical wounds. Read Part 1 here.

As our journey through the exciting and uncharted, choppy waters of atypical wounds comes to a close, I discuss a few more wounds. The purpose and goal of this blog are to create awareness of other wounds that exist and instill the curiosity in my fellow clinicians to get our research done.

Susan Cleveland's picture
Preventing MASD by Moving

by Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

Part 1 in a two-part series looking at the basics of preventing and managing moisture-associated skin damage in the long-term care setting.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture
wound care and legal issues

by Aletha Tippett MD

Medical providers, and especially wound care providers, seem to always be under the looming shadow of lawsuits and legal issues. I have written about this before, but it continues to be an issue as I receive requests for legal reviews repeatedly. I have read many charts for legal reviews, and it actually is very straightforward to avoid or mitigate any legal problems.