Wound Assessment

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Surgical Wound

by the WoundSource Editors

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate approximately 30 million surgical procedures are performed annually in the United States.1 Advances in technology have afforded patients options such as minimally invasive surgery, commonly known as laparoscopic or arthroscopic surgery, which tend to result in much smaller (1cm–2cm) incisions.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Wound Assessment

by the WoundSource Editors

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are ostensibly the most challenging types of chronic ulcerations to manage, given their multifactorial nature. Thorough, systematic assessment of a patient with a DFU is essential to developing a comprehensive plan of care. To implement the treatment plan successfully, clinicians and patients must work together to address each factor contributing to ulcer development and perpetuation.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

Overview

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are arguably among the most difficult types of wounds to manage; the etiology of these wounds poses some of the greatest clinical challenges for healing, considering the multifaceted nature of diabetes mellitus (DM). Multiple patient-related factors must be addressed and controlled through faithful adherence to the prescribed plan of care, which is developed by both the patient and clinicians to ensure success.

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Sharon Baronoski's picture
Obesity

By Sharon Baranoski, MSN, RN, CWCN, APN-CCNS, FAAN and Kimberly LeBlanc, PhD, RN, WOCC©, IIWCC

Editor's note:This blog post is part of the WoundSource Trending Topics series, bringing you insight into the latest clinical issues and advancement in wound management, with contributions by the WoundSource Editorial Advisory Board.

Margaret Heale's picture
Standardized Documentation

by Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

Wound care can be so straightforward. The process starts with a comprehensive assessment, and then the wound care regimen can be planned and the frequency of dressing changes determined. A well-written order will include all of the relevant components of a wound care regimen listed below:

Cheryl Carver's picture
Combat Medicine

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, DAPWCA, FACCWS, CLTC – Wound Educator

As a veteran of the U.S. Army, and having a grandfather who was a U.S. Army combat medic, I have always had an interest in combat wound care. Wound care has evolved immensely throughout the years in the military arena. The treatments used as far back as the fifth century B.C. were inconceivable. Examples are keeping wounds dry, wound irrigation with water and wine, burning oil into infected wounds, and topicals such as egg yolks, rose oil, and turpentine applied to the wound bed. Odor was controlled with bags of lavender at the soldier’s bedside.