Wound Assessment

Beth Hawkins Bradley's picture

By Beth Hawkins Bradley RN, MN, CWON

How often do you really consider the person that is attached to the wound you are treating? Do you take seriously those complaints, grunts, and grimaces that he sends your way when you remove drape and peel foam from a wound being treated with negative pressure? It isn’t pretty, but it is pretty important. I would love to hear what you think after you read and consider the content.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

Assessment of the individual for palliative wound care is not much different from the assessment for any wound patient. Initial questions that that should be asked in your assessment include:

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY, PT. 11

I have always had a penchant for the ironic. I love a great joke well told, an amusing anecdote well written or a cartoon well drawn. Charles Addams, creator of the Addams family in the New Yorker magazine introduced his “unusual” family by drawing them poised several stories above and looking down upon a group of happy, singing Christmas carolers as they prepared to pour boiling oil on them. I still chuckle when I think about it. I love unusual sayings such as “You have a firm grasp of the obvious”, “You may not be good, but at least you’re slow” or “I can’t see the forest because of the trees.”

Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY, PT. 10

A house call to a delightful 78-year-old lady revealed a history of a hip prosthesis placed three years earlier that unfortunately had become infected. When the first surgeon could not be found (he had moved out of state just in time), his associate opened the hip, carefully lavaged out the “Root Beer Float” material (per the family, an interesting description if I ever heard one), and then closed the hip primarily.

Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY, PT. 9

One of the most obvious things about being a health care professional is that our goal is to help people get better. The concepts of an ill patient saying to me, "Dr. Miller, I don't want to get better or worse, can you do something to keep me in this condition?" Seems ludicrous and more, improbable. I could not imagine any health care professional being successful if patients remained in the exact same condition weeks after treatment. As I have said in previous blogs, I recognize that while there are many variations on the definition of "better", I think it's safe to say that "better" means improved in some way, shape, or form.

Thomas Serena's picture

By Thomas E. Serena MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

"Would you like that super-sized?" is a phrase made popular by the fast food giant McDonald’s. The McDonald’s marketing geniuses tapped into a sentiment that permeates the American psyche. We are convinced that bigger is better; that size can be equated with financial stability and better service. However, if there is a lesson to be learned from recent history it is bigger is not always better or even desirable.

Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

The responses that I have been getting from the blogs are terrific! It is wonderful to know that clinicians are interested, questioning, and wanting to know what is in products. So, now in 2012, we continue this blog with the topic of products and practice.

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 3

I just had the most amazing thing happen: I received a letter from my hospital informing me that they were considering creating an Open-Heart Surgery Center. Other than myself, there will be Radiologists, Family Practitioners, and Pathologists all participating in the program. In an effort to share the proceeds from participating in this venture, all participants will be offered four hour time periods throughout the week in which to practice this new specialty. Recognizing that we are not experts in this area of medicine, each of us will be required to take a one-week course in open-heart surgery before being able to hang our shingles outside the clinic.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

In my work with wounds, I frequently find the absence of a diagnosis of ischemia, or worse, I find a misdiagnosis. Ischemia is caused by severe obstruction of the arteries, which seriously decreases blood flow. If the arteries are in the heart, you will find a heart attack. If the arteries are in the brain, you will find a stroke. In the skin, you will find a wound.