Wound Healing

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
nutritional supplements for healing wounds

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Several nutrients, such as arginine, zinc, vitamin A, vitamin E and vitamin C, play a key role in wound healing and preserving tissue viability. However, while current research doesn’t confirm consuming mega doses of any of these minerals or vitamins, there are studies supporting combining adequate amounts of these nutrients in an oral nutritional supplement to facilitate wound healing.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
chronic wound healing

By the WoundSource Editors

The stages of wound healing proceed in an organized way and follow four processes: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and maturation. Although the stages of wound healing are linear, wounds can progress backward or forward depending on internal and external patient conditions. The four stages of wound healing are:

WoundSource Editors's picture
the final stage of wound healing

By the WoundSource Editors

Moist wound healing is the practice of keeping a wound in an optimally moist environment in order to promote faster healing. Research has shown that moist wound healing is three to five times quicker than the healing of wounds that are allowed to dry out.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
advanced bioactive wound technologies

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

The growing market for bioactive wound care products has been very interesting and exciting to me. I have been involved the past couple years as an anonymous wound panel expert, council member, and consultant for upcoming bioactive wound care dressing research. We will start seeing an increase in various biomaterials, versus gauze and superabsorbent dressing types used globally. Multifunctional-type dressings will also make waves.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
lean body mass

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Recently, I attended a webinar that focused on dietary protein and preserving lean muscle mass. There is a wealth of research on this topic, in particular, as it relates to older adults and protecting muscle health during inactivity. Dr. Robert Demling noted the effect of lean body mass (LBM) loss on wound healing. Healing a wound requires increased calories to prevent the body from breaking down protein (LBM) for energy, thus depleting protein stores required for protein synthesis and healing. Lean body mass is metabolically active, transports protein throughout the body and is essential for survival as it contains all of the skeletal and smooth muscles and immune cells. Healthy adults lose between 3-8% of LBM per decade and after age 70 muscle loss increases to 15% per decade. This loss of LBM or sarcopenia is an age-related, insidious loss of lean muscle mass accelerated by physical inactivity and poor nutrition.

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Bruce Ruben's picture
NPWT affixed to a lower extremity wound

By Bruce E. Ruben MD

Little has been shown by specific randomized controlled trials to effectively speed the healing of a non-healing wound. Biologically, the human body is capable of healing once constitutional barriers are relieved. These barriers include venous and arterial insufficiency, nutritional deficiency, deep-seated infection, and environmental barriers such as repetitive trauma.

Michel Hermans's picture
monitoring the healing time of partial-thickness burns

By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

Recently I paid a visit to one of the better known wound care centers in the North East. As I expected, treatment of the common lesions seen in this center, such as venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers, was top notch. The use of compression and offloading, proper wound debridement and modern dressings (including, where indicated, biologics and matrices), in combination with the option for vascular, plastic and orthopedic (i.e. for Charcot foot) reconstruction resulted in good healing results, with high percentages of reepithelialization within a relatively short time frame.

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
protecting hearts and healing wounds through nutrition

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

February is American Heart Month and Valentine’s Day is celebrated around the world on the 14th. So what is the connection between protecting your heart, enjoying candy and flowers with those you love on Valentine’s Day, and wound care? Many of your clients with wounds also have some type of heart disease or have elevated lipid levels. These clients need nutritional strategies for wound healing that also protects their hearts.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
laser therapy used in the treatment of wounds

By Aletha Tippett MD

It would be interesting to know how many people reading this blog have tried laser therapy for wound healing. I suspect not many, and that is unfortunate because laser therapy can be a wonderful adjuvant for wound healing.

Samantha Kuplicki's picture
Wound Care Case Study

By Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, AGCNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

This is the account of a patient case in which technology, clinician experience, and patient adherence converged to save a limb.