Wound Healing

Janet Wolfson's picture
Lymphatic System

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Introduction, History, and Practitioner Background

Manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) was developed by Emil and Estrid Vodder in the 1930s. They dedicated their lives to the study of lymphatic anatomy and physiology. Since then, others have modified the original techniques, including Foeldi, Leduc, Casley-Smith, and Bjork. They all involve manual contact with the client, deep diaphragmatic breathing, stimulation of the lymph nodes, and movement of fluid from proximal and then distal areas. The manual contacts are slow, gentle, and rhythmic. Practitioners are typically occupational or physical therapists, physical and occupational therapy assistants, nurses, massage therapists, and physicians. Many practitioners, after a required 135-hour training program, complete the Lymphedema Association of North America (LANA) certification exam.

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Industry News's picture

Christchurch, New Zealand – March 28, 2018 – Two new smart-phone based imaging products, SilhouetteLite+ and SilhouetteLite, recently launched by ARANZ Medical Limited have been adopted by Promore Pharma AB (Solna, Sweden) for a multi-site clinical trial, and by New Zealand's Capital and Coast District Health Board for their community-based nurses.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Wound Care Journal Club Review

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Nurse with Patient

by WoundSource Editors

Chronic wounds are any types of wounds that have failed to heal in 90 days. Identifying the cause of a chronic wound is most important in the healing process. We as clinicians must help bolster advanced wound care by sharing advances in education in evidence-based treatment, prevention, and wound assessment.1

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Periwound skin

By the WoundSource Editors

The periwound is as important as the wound. As clinicians, we should carefully assess the wound bed, but we need to remember also to assess the periwound and surrounding skin. The periwound should be considered the 4cm of surrounding skin extending from the wound bed. Chronic wounds may manifest any of the following characteristics, depending on wound type: erythema, induration, epibole, ecchymosis, hyperkeratosis, and changes in shape.1,2

Hy-Tape International's picture
Patient Activity

by Hy-Tape International

Maintaining an active lifestyle is critical to good health; this is especially true for patients recovering from wounds or extended hospital stays. Robust activity can improve mental health, reduce the risk of infection, and accelerate wound healing.1 Staying active can be challenging for patients with wounds, however, and it is critical that health care professionals take steps to enable their patients to stay as active as possible.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Wound Care Journal Club Review

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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