Skin Conditions/Skin Care

Laurie Swezey's picture
maceration of periwound skin

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

A wound that is too moist can be as detrimental to wound healing as a wound that is too dry. When a wound is too moist, the skin surrounding the wound, known as the periwound, can become macerated. Skin that is macerated is vulnerable to breakdown, leading to a possible increase in wound size.

Laurie Swezey's picture
Skin moisture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Bariatric patients present a special challenge in terms of skin care and prevention of pressure ulcers. Once damage to the skin occurs, bariatric patients heal more slowly due to decreased vascularity of the skin and reduced perfusion of adipose tissue. Bariatric patients are at high risk for acute wounds, pressure ulcers, venous ulcers, non-healing surgical wounds and diabetic wounds of the foot.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Remedy Products by Medline

By Cerise Adams and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Our skin is the largest organ in our body requiring a significant amount of vascular support to stay healthy and protective. As we get older, our circulation slows down just when our skin needs more support and more nutrition to continue to function. Besides regular cleansing and proper moisturizing, our skin needs nutrients to maintain its ideal function. The Medline Remedy skin care line has attempted to provide that with a topical, bioavailable formula that is antinflammatory and easily absorbed by skin cells.

Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

This article is designed to provide a review of cellulitis, an infection affecting the skin which can be life-threatening if not treated.

Margaret Heale's picture

Yy Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Hi blog buddies, Matron Marley here. I may be an ex-matron, but I may just have some gems for you. Today I would like to cast the threads (strings even) of time back to when I was a new nurse rather than a matron. The reason being the change happened then. I remembered it today when a rather frail lady caught her arm on a door mechanism. It tore such a huge triangle of her delicate skin, and my goodness did it bleed. I put on the gloves I keep in my pocket and pressed several napkins on it while the nurse went for supplies. She returned promptly with gloves, hand gel, gauze, skin prep, saline, cotton swabs, Xeroform, net and Steri-Strips™ (great invention, right up there with Velcro and cyanoacrylate).

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

What is Bag Balm® and why is it the subject of a wound care blog? Bag Balm is over 100 years old, invented in 1899 to treat chapped and irritated cows' udders and teats. Of course, the Bag Balm was applied by hand to the cows' udder and teats and farmers noticed that not only were there cows doing better with healthy udders and teats, their hands were better—not chapped or reddened, not as sore, and much softer. Their calluses were reduced, too. Because of this, Bag Balm became indispensable to the farmers and virtually every farm kitchen had a green can of Bag Balm.

Diana Gallagher's picture

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

I frequently write about the value and rewards of being a WOCNCB® certified nurse. It is an amazing job that allows me to save limbs and change lives on a daily basis. After decades of working in acute and outpatient care, I now work as an independent consultant. I teach, I write, and I see patients on a daily basis. Where I live, we currently do not have a single home health agency that employs a Certified Wound and Ostomy Nurse (CWOCN®). Routine wound and ostomy care can be easily managed but when there are those challenging patients with difficult wounds or unusual ostomies, there is a clear need for the care of a CWOCN.

Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Another day at Rose Cottage is over and I am remembering some events and pondering as I wait for my granddaughter to finish work and drop me off home. I have been volunteering here a while now and am getting used to being in a position of watching, listening and not having to react to everything as I am just an outsider helping out. I was a matron though, and the patterns within my brain are such that I must at least ponder at where we are, where we came from and where we are heading. ‘Ahhh,’ you are thinking she is going to bemoan modern nursing and call for a return to the good old days, well you’d be wrong. I am not sure it was all so good and with new blood, new technologies and modern versions of Flo, we will see our Scutari change and develop into a new and exciting place. Well you will, I will join my fellows here at some point and allow you to care and listen.

Janis Harrison's picture

B Janis E. Harrison, RN, BSN, CWOCN, CFCN

My husband was insistent that I go home the first night he was on the surgical floor. He had a roommate, therefore the hospital policy forbade me to stay the night with him.

Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

I was in the shower getting ready for my day volunteering at the nursing home and my mind bemoaned again how much I miss bathing. Relaxing in a deep hot bath, preferably with bubbles, background music and a cool drink...heavenly! Then I started thinking about how much the process of personal hygiene has changed since I was matron, way back when. As a child we bathed on Sundays which was great because the house was warmer on Sundays. I remember being really surprised when I went into nursing that we washed patients every day. By the time I was matron we had got rid of rubber draw sheets and had plastic ones. The rubber absorbed some of the odor from the urine, quite unpleasant. Linen changes were more frequent and we ran out of linen less frequently than earlier in my career. Most hospitals had their own laundry back then.