Assessment

Janet Wolfson's picture
A Multidisciplinary Approach to Incontinence

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

My current job as wound coordinator has pulled me into the world of incontinence and the many disciplines that care for people challenged by this disorder. I was previously acquainted with the therapy side as I worked with therapists certified in pelvic floor therapy. My work with venous edema acquainted me with medications that caused continence-challenged people to resort to absorbent adult briefs. As I work more closely with physicians, I am more familiar with medications to support weakened or sensitive pelvic muscles and nerves. On the nursing side, I have researched support surfaces, incontinence pads, and barrier creams. I see patients and occupational therapists working together to regain continence independence through problem-solving mobility issues.

Blog Category: 
Margaret Heale's picture
Details

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

In our point, click, fill-in-the -blanks world of ever increasing wound care algorithms and MOs, I have an ax to grind (straight into my so-called smart phone if I had the courage).

Blog Category: 
WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
skin assessment and moisture-associated skin damage

by the WoundSource Editors

The performance of an accurate and complete skin assessment is of utmost importance to obtaining and maintaining healthy skin. Understanding the structure and function of the skin is key to the differentiation of normal from abnormal findings. Having this baseline knowledge aids in determining the patient's level of risk, how skin is damaged, the impact of moisture on the skin, the resulting type of moisture-associated skin damage (MASD), and whether current skin care protocols are effective and adequate.

Diane Krasner's picture
wound care documentation

By Diane L. Krasner, PhD, RN, FAAN

Editor's note:This blog post is part of the WoundSource Trending Topics series, bringing you insight into the latest clinical issues and advancement in wound management, with contributions by the WoundSource Editorial Advisory Board.

Cheryl Carver's picture
Telemedicine Wound Care

by Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Let's be frank: wound care telemedicine cannot replace a visit to a physician's office or the wound care center. Telemedicine was primarily developed to reduce visits and help serve people living in rural communities. However, telemedicine can supplement advanced wound care in many ways, and has been proven to be time saving and effective. Telemedicine in wound care has its pros and cons (like anything else), but with a protocol-driven approach, it is effective for wound healing.

Samantha Kuplicki's picture
Pain

by Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

The Patient Assessment

You've been asked to evaluate a patient for negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). It turns out they're a perfect candidate, so you start the process to have the unit placed immediately! The order is entered into the EHR for the recommended settings, and the initial dressing application is scheduled.

Lydia Meyers's picture
Bacteria culture

by Lydia A. Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

Wound infections are discussed in the media and are a major reason for admission into the hospital. With the importance in health care today to decrease costs, I was encouraged to do research into where infections come from and the causes for hospitalization and death among wound patients. In the current data I found there is information showing how the government has increased surveillance related to reportable admission to hospital in relation to infections in wounds by home health and hospice organizations.

Blog Category: 
Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Braden Scale

by Aletha Tippett MD

I was recently asked to speak on best practices for prevention of pressure ulcers for a group of state surveyors. This is an excellent subject and here is how I would address it:

Blog Category: