Debridement

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Delayed healing in diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is the result of the polymicrobial structures of DFUs and the buildup of biofilms. Wound debridement is an essential part of wound bed preparation (WBP) that helps to remove bacteria and allow the body to continue the healing process. Although sharp debridement is the most common technique used for DFUs, it has many limitations, including contraindications in patients with poor vascular status, the need for an operating room, and the requirement for specific surgeon skills. There is also the potential for extensive damage to the wound bed with exposed bone because of obstruction of the view from biofilm formation. The use of an ultrasound-assisted wound (UAW) debridement device aims to disrupt the formation of biofilms and stimulate wound granulation, thus allowing for the wound to have a healthy environment in which to heal. This study evaluated the clinical and microbiological impact of using UAW debridement devices in individuals with neuroischemic DFUs.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Article Title: Graduating Student Nurses' and Student Podiatrists' Wound Care Competence: A Cross-Sectional Study
Authors: Kielo E, Salminen L, Suhonen R, Puukka P, Stolt M
Journal: J Wound Care. 2019;28(3):136-145
Reviewed by: Stephanie Golding, class of 2020, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

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Wound Bed Preparation for Chronic Wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound bed preparation is a well-established concept, and the TIME framework is the standard tool used to assist clinicians with the management of patients’ wounds throughout the care cycle. Recent clinical and technological breakthroughs are enhancing our understanding of this care cycle. An overview of the wound bed preparation care cycle and the TIME framework is provided here.

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Frequently Asked Questions

By James McGuire, DPM, PT, LPed, FAPWHc

In my recent WoundSource webinar, I discussed the topic of debridement strategies and chronic wounds. The webinar is still available for viewing on WoundSource.com. Wound debridement is the foundation for healing in chronic wounds. Excessive debridement is a detriment to healing, whereas proper removal of accumulated non-viable tissue or foreign material from the wound bed maintains a healthy progressive healing trajectory and avoids wound chronicity.

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Ron Sherman's picture
Maggot Debridement Therapy

By Ronald A. Sherman, MD

The year 2019 began with a shadow over the field of biosurgery and a dark cloud over American health care: BioMonde, currently the largest producer of medicinal maggots in the world, just closed its American laboratory. Most famous for its dressing containing medicinal maggots within a net bag (BioBag™), BioMonde has been very profitable in Europe for years, where it operates two busy maggot-producing laboratories (in Wales and Germany). In 2014, with $5 million of dedicated investor funding, BioMonde opened a laboratory in Florida to serve the American market. Despite the popularity of their flagship product, BioMonde's US laboratory never turned a profit. Simply stated, sales were not high enough... but why?

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Chronic Wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

The wound healing cascade is a complex process that follows a strict sequence of molecular events. The complex series of events depend on one another and must take place in a timely and orderly fashion within the body’s natural host processes. The phases of acute wound healing, in order, are hemostasis, inflammatory, proliferative, and maturation. If the cascade of events is interrupted, the acute wound status then develops into a non-healing or chronic status. Wound stalling occurs in the inflammatory and proliferative stages of healing. In chronic wounds, there appears to be an overproduction of matrix molecules resulting from underlying cellular dysfunction and dysregulation. Non-viable or devitalized tissue lengthens the inflammatory phase of healing and increases risk of infection.

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Patient Outcomes

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound chronicity is a major concern, and removing barriers with each stage of healing is paramount. Debridement may occur naturally by the body’s own ability to slough off dead tissue; however, often this tissue needs to be removed medically. The goal of wound debridement is to provide consistent wound bed preparation along with good healing outcomes. Removing non-viable tissue and foreign material is the first goal of debridement. Non-viable tissue not only inhibits the development of healthy new tissue but also increases the risk of infection. Non-viable tissue includes slough and eschar, which create the perfect recipe for bacterial growth and infection. Viable tissue is granulation and epithelial tissue, which is beneficial to normal healing. Wounds that present devitalized tissue and/or biofilm warrant one or more of the debridement methods to promote healing. Since 2006, debridement has been found to be advantageous in managing complex wounds.

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Debridement Methods

By the WoundSource Editors

A wound specialist’s job is to outline the options available for treatment. It is the patient’s job to choose a treatment option. Patients do not even have to select the best option. They must choose an option that works for them given their unique circumstances having a wound. When it comes to selecting debridement methods there are several options to choose from. This article will provide an overview of the most common debridement methods.

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Debridement

By the WoundSource Editors

In chronic wounds, debridement can be used to remove dead and necrotic tissue or to remove foreign material. Debridement has repeatedly been shown to expedite healing and is recognized as a critical element in wound care. There are several methods of debridement, some of which may or may not be the best option, depending on the health care setting, so practitioners should follow their individual state licensure boards’ professional scope and practice and the facilities’ policies when considering debridement.

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by the WoundSource Editors

Autolytic debridement: A method of debridement that uses the body’s own enzymes and the moisture trapped beneath the dressing to liquefy non-viable tissue. Although it is the safest method, it is also very slow and therefore not the best option for wounds with large amounts of necrotic tissue.

Biofilm: A complex microbial community containing bacteria and fungi. The microorganisms synthesize and secrete a protective matrix that attaches the biofilm firmly to a living or non-living surface. The biofilm contributes to underlying wound infection, chronic inflammation, and delay in healing, and it is present in 60% of chronic wounds and 6% of acute wounds.

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