Deep Tissue Pressure Injury

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
The Future of Pressure Injury Prevention

By the WoundSource Editors

Pressure injuries represent a great challenge in patient care, as well as a significant burden on the health care system. This burden is likely to continue to increase as a result of the growing geriatric population, along with the increasing rates of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Recent estimates in the United States show annual costs of pressure injury treatment to be approximately $9.1 to $11.6 billion. In addition to cost, these localized injuries to the skin are often very painful for patients, particularly as the injuries become more severe.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Pressure Injury Interventions in Special Populations

By the WoundSource Editors

Pressure injuries require complex care. They can be incredibly painful for patients, and they represent an enormous financial burden on the health care system. Nationally, pressure ulcers cost between approximately $9.1 and $11.6 billion annually to treat. A subset of these patients includes those who are particularly prone to developing pressure ulcers as a result of comorbid conditions. This subset includes patients who may have cognitive disabilities, those who have a spinal injury or have undergone an amputation, and bariatric patients.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Skin Care for Pressure Injury Prevention

By the WoundSource Editors

Pressure injuries are a significant risk for patients and pose a tremendous clinical challenge to medical providers. Serious pressure injuries can present a substantial threat to patients' survival when comorbidities are present, and even less serious pressure injuries can negatively affect a patient's comfort and well-being. Although some pressure injuries are unavoidable, best practices in patient skin care can greatly reduce the risk in many circumstances, with some research demonstrating that up to 95% of pressure injuries are preventable.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Patient Preparation for Pressure Injury Prevention

By the WoundSource Editors

With aging populations facing increasingly complex comorbid medical conditions coupled with polypharmacy and multidrug-resistant organisms, wound healing can often feel like an uphill, never-ending battle. There are often elements that cannot be allayed, and some factors will always be outside the control of the patient and the practitioner. Barriers that can be eliminated should be, but sometimes compliance is a concern.

Lindsay Andronaco's picture

By Lindsay D. Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Cultural sensitivity and awareness is something that as healthcare providers, we say we practice – but do we always practice what we preach?

Karen Zulkowski's picture
Skin Conditions

By Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

I previously discussed the need for a complete head-to-toe skin assessment. Certainly this can tell you whether or not the person is dehydrated, has open or discolored areas, and many other things about their overall health. Color, for example, can give you clues to additional problems such as vitamin and mineral deficiencies that can show on the skin.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

We are supposed to check a wound every week and measure length, width and depth. These measurements should be getting smaller if the wound is healing, and we need to see improvement within two weeks, or have to consider that we need a different dressing on the wound. Of course, we also look at the type of tissue in the wound - granulation, slough, or necrosis - and the amount of drainage and odor. Those things can change our opinion about the wound. Maybe the wound measurements are not smaller but the wound has good granulation and shows signs of contraction - that wound is healing despite the measurements. Wound measurements can be very inaccurate. Often it depends on how the patient is positioned and who is doing the measurement. Even the same person taking measurements will not be the same every time.

Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Here I am again, Matron Marley, working as a volunteer in the local nursing home on just my second visit. I had a little difficulty getting in and discovered it was because of the door lock alarm on a resident. Such a good idea but a bit irritating. I managed to sneak in while the resident moved away briefly and entered into a bright airy reception area, so welcoming. The first home I ran was really dingy with cold stone steps to the 1st floor where the ‘geri’ ward was. Today I am greeted by a woman about my age with a pocket book asking, “Is the bus here yet, I have to pick up Robbie.” I heard the door click as she neared it, locking out my granddaughter who works here. I coaxed her away from the door with a promise to help her find the bus down a long hallway. It is soon revealed that she is a wanderer and spends much of her time trying to exit the building. Her mention of the bus brought to mind a patient I'd once had named Mable.

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