Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Article Title: Ultrasound-Assisted Debridement of Neuroischaemic Diabetic Foot Ulcers, Clinical and Microbiological Effects: A Case Series
Authors: Lazaro-Martinez JL, Alvaro-Afonso FJ, Garcia-Alverez Y, Molines-Barroso RJ, Garcia-Morales E, Sevillano-Fernandez D
Journal: J Wound Care. 2018;27(5):278-286
Reviewed by: Timothy Vo, class of 2020, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

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Hy-Tape International's picture
Management Strategies for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

By Hy-Tape International

According to a published study, the global prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is 6.3%, with male patients and older adults being the most likely to be affected.1 This prevalence, coupled with the potential for complications and the severe effect on quality of life the condition can have, makes DFUs one of today's most serious health care issues. To reduce the effects of DFUs and improve outcomes for patients, it is critical that health care professionals rapidly identify DFUs and implement best practice dressing and management strategies.

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by the WoundSource Editors

Cellular and/or tissue-based products: Formally referred to as skin substitutes, these are engineered products, both cellular and acellular, intended to facilitate biological repair or regeneration of wound tissue by providing signaling, structural, or cellular elements.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Diabetic Foot Ulcers

By the WoundSource Editors

The definition of a diabetic wound of the lower extremity in its simplest form could be described as an open area on the lower extremity limb of anyone with diabetes. Some wound specialists would also state that pre-diabetes is still diabetes in a wound care world, so if someone with pre-diabetes develops a wound you should still treat it as if the patient had diabetes.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Risk Factors for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

By the WoundSource Editors

Diabetes is one of the most common and costly conditions encountered in the U.S. health care system. The condition impacts over 23 million people annually, for a total cost of $245 billion per year. Although surgical infections remain the leading cause of non-healing wounds, diabetic infections follow closely behind, and they impose a substantial financial burden on the U.S. health care system. Treatment of diabetic ulcers in the United States contributes an additional $9 to $13 billion to the direct annual costs associated with diabetes.

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Classification Systems for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

By the WoundSource Editors

In patients with diabetes, the lifetime risk of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is approximately 25%, and these wounds are frequently a source of pain and discomfort. Severe cases can even result in amputation of a portion of or the entire affected extremity. Proper classification of DFUs is essential for selecting the appropriate treatment course and coordinating care for the patient. Several systems are frequently used in classifying DFUs, although there is no universally agreed-on standard.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Diabetic Foot Ulcer Interventions

By the WoundSource Editors

For people with diabetes who develop a wound, the statistics are high. The data are as overwhelming as the cost of care, and the outcome if these wounds do not heal is often deadly. The faster we can intervene and get closure in these limbs, the better the patient outcomes and chance for a longer, fulfilled life. How do we go from ulceration to closure, and what tools do we need in our arsenal?

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Factors Contributing to Complex Wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

A vast percentage of wounds become chronically stalled because of mixed etiology and other underlying comorbid medical conditions. This means the wound is multifactorial, and using a singular approach won’t be enough. Lower extremity wounds, for example, can have diabetes, venous and arterial issues, and pressure all as factors playing into the same wound.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Article Title: Stability, Activity, and Application of Topical Doxycycline Formulations in a Diabetic Wound Case Study
Authors: Gabriele, S; Buchanan, B; Kundu, A; Dwyer, HC; Gabriele, JP; Mayer, P; Baranowski, DC
Journal: Wounds. 2019;31(2):49-54
Reviewed by: Garrett Biela, Class of 2020, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Industry News's picture

By PolarityTE®

Salt Lake City – May 10, 2019 – PolarityTE, Inc., a biotechnology company developing and commercializing regenerative tissue products and biomaterials, announced today data from two pilot studies on the use of its SkinTE™ product both showing successful closure of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and venous stasis leg ulcers (VLUs) within a 12-week period. The cases involved patients with lower extremity chronic wounds that were difficult to treat or had failed to heal with standard dressing care and conventional treatments, using a single application of SkinTE.

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