Dressing

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Moisture Management

by the WoundSource Editors

Before embarking on the journey of wound bed preparation, the goals for wound care should be carefully considered. A realistic look at the goals and expectations from the perspective of the patient as well as the wound care team is the first step in developing and implementing the appropriate plan of care.

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Margaret Heale's picture
compression wrapping

By Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

Wrapping wounds is an art, and hence, it comes easily to some and more difficult to others. This post won't make you a wound dressing artist, but it does provide some tips for good bandaging techniques. The word "bandage" (in the US) often refers to a primary dressing, so "wrap" better describes a bandage that is long, narrow, and may be used to secure a primary dressing or obtain graduated compression on a limb.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Vashe Wound Solution

By Keval Parikh and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

An important aspect of the field of wound care is the proper preparation of the wound bed. Key points in wound bed preparation include minimizing exudate, assistance in the facilitation of the body’s healing process, and helping to produce a well-vascularized, stable wound that is free of microbes.

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Karen Zulkowski's picture

By Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

In my last blog, I talked about cultural beliefs affecting care. But there are geographic differences in North America that do also; for example, temperature. Temperature as a concept in the Chinese culture balances hot and cold illnesses with corresponding foods. However, in macro terms outside temperature also affects care.

Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 3

I just had the most amazing thing happen: I received a letter from my hospital informing me that they were considering creating an Open-Heart Surgery Center. Other than myself, there will be Radiologists, Family Practitioners, and Pathologists all participating in the program. In an effort to share the proceeds from participating in this venture, all participants will be offered four hour time periods throughout the week in which to practice this new specialty. Recognizing that we are not experts in this area of medicine, each of us will be required to take a one-week course in open-heart surgery before being able to hang our shingles outside the clinic.