Foot Care

Mark Hinkes's picture

By Dr. Mark Hinkes, DPM

I recently read a synopsis about how Obamacare will affect the type of health care services that will be available in the marketplace and the age groups that will be helped and hurt the most by this new law.1 Not really knowing much about Obamacare, I read the article and ended up feeling deeply disturbed and shocked at what Mr. Obama and the Congress have unleashed upon us. The news is not good for patients with wounds and for those who practice wound care.

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Bruce Ruben's picture

By Bruce E. Ruben MD

Part 2 in a series on infection management
For Part 1, click here

Our skin is our largest organ and performs a myriad of functions, including pain sensation, pressure sensitivity, temperature regulation and water conservation.

Mark Hinkes's picture

By Dr. Mark Hinkes, DPM

Twenty first century technology is helping people with diabetes to heal foot ulcers. An Australian colleague, for example, is developing an application that reminds people with diabetes to control their blood sugars with prompts and instructions, and allows them to upload a picture of their wound for their podiatrist to evaluate.

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Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

I have been living with my daughter for almost a year and helping out at a nursing home where my granddaughter works. I don't remember having this problem last year but my skin is just on fire at times, itchy, itchy, itchy! I found a cream but ran out and couldn't remember what it was called. When I got to the pharmacy and told the lady there that I was in search of a product whose name I thought sounded like 'Narnia' she pointed me in the right direction. Then, to my surprise, she added, "but remember not to go through the wardrobe door or you might get more than you bargained for." We laughed so much I remembered I best go to the feminine hygiene section. I just wanted a slim little pad, you know for the odd cough or sneeze, but—ohhh—what a choice!

Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA, WCC

The movie, The Horse Whisperer, lavishly showed that taking the time to become one with the subject of your attentions has the greatest potential to provide a symbiosis and subsequently, a healing. In the movie, an injured horse appears to be the primary focus but the astute viewer soon learns that this is but the tip of the tip of the iceberg. In fact, the interactions with the horse itself becomes merely a starting point rather than the focal point for the movie. As the story unfolds, we identify complex cross-current personality patterns, events and human frailties that ultimately becomes a soufflé; something involving significant complexity and skill with the highest risk of a catastrophic outcome, that when all things come together in the perfect proportions at the perfect time in the perfect way rise to become a thing of beauty. In the case of this movie, the horse, its owner and her mother all become transmuted for their own betterment and ultimately leave the horse whisperer to do as he has always done.

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David Hite's picture

By David Hite PhD

Diabetes, the leading cause of amputation of the lower limbs, places an enormous burden on both the individual and the health care system. It’s estimated that the annual cost for treating diabetic foot problems is over one billion dollars. During their lifetime, 15 percent of people with diabetes will experience a foot ulcer and about 20 percent of those will require amputation.

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY, PT. 10

A house call to a delightful 78-year-old lady revealed a history of a hip prosthesis placed three years earlier that unfortunately had become infected. When the first surgeon could not be found (he had moved out of state just in time), his associate opened the hip, carefully lavaged out the “Root Beer Float” material (per the family, an interesting description if I ever heard one), and then closed the hip primarily.

Kim Coy Decoste's picture

By Kim Coy DeCoste RN, MSN, CDE

It can be quite concerning when you ask your patients attending a DSME class “How many of you have had your feet checked for blood flow and nerve function by your health care provider?”, and far less than half of them raise their hands. Probing a little further, you find that a number of patients have never even had their feet visually inspected by their health care provider (HCP) for signs of diabetic foot ulcers. This isn’t unique to my practice site. Recently when I was teaching a professional education program with diabetes educators from across the US, most in the group concurred with my findings.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett, MD

This is a statement the cardiologist made to my patient the other day. My patient is a diabetic man with severe neuropathy, resulting in pain and numbness in his feet, as well as difficulty walking. He also has a serious cardiac history with multiple myocardial infarctions. When he first came to me he was, of course, on a statin medication for his heart. One of my tenets for treating neuropathy is to stop statin treatment because it can increase neuropathy 26 fold (1).

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Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the most dreaded complications of diabetes, and represent a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. It is estimated that a lower limb is sacrificed every 30 seconds somewhere in the world due to diabetes, and that diabetes is the reason for almost 50% of non-traumatic amputations of the lower leg throughout the world. Considering these facts, proper management of diabetic foot ulcers is of paramount importance.

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