Ostomy Management

Holly Hovan's picture
Ostomy Care

By Holly M. Hovan, MSN, RN-BC, APRN, CWOCN-AP

A new ostomy can be intimidating and life-changing, but also lifesaving. Many people experience a new degree of independence after ostomy surgery and often become advocates and support people for other people with ostomies. However, the initial post-operative period can be scary. People with new ostomies often have questions and concerns, and they make some lifestyle changes as well. In this blog, I will be discussing some of the most common questions I receive from people with new ostomies as a WOC nurse specialist. I will also be sharing some tips and tricks that people with new ostomies have shared with me throughout my years in WOC nursing. Review the questions and answers provided here so you will be prepared to answer your patients’ questions and help them adjust to their new lifestyle.

Holly Hovan's picture
WOC Nursing

Holly Hovan MSN, RN-BC, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

As you may have already heard, the World Health Organization (WHO) has designated 2020 as the year of the nurse and midwife. The WHO has informed us that in order to achieve universal health coverage by 2030, we need 9 million more nurses and midwives! This is a huge number. Just think, if 9 million more nurses and midwives are needed, how many more wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC) specialists are going to be needed?

Holly Hovan's picture
Ostomy Certification

By Holly M. Hovan, MSN, RN-BC, APRN, CWOCN-AP

As someone who holds tricertification, I often feel as though my ostomy patients are the ones in whose lives I am making the biggest difference. Watching them progress, gain confidence in independent ostomy management, and enjoy their lives once again is one of the best feelings to me!

Holly Hovan's picture
Peristomal Skin Complications

by Holly Hovan MSN, RN-BC, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

As discussed in a prior blog, stoma location is certainly one of the key factors in successful ostomy management and independence with care at home. However, even with proper stoma siting, peristomal skin complications may occur for a variety of reasons. In this blog I discuss a few of the more common peristomal skin complications and tips for management.

Hy-Tape International's picture
Ostomy Care Supplies

by Hy-Tape International

Ostomy surgery is an increasingly common treatment for patients with Crohn's disease. With over 450,000 people with stomas in the United States and 120,000 new ostomy surgical procedures performed each year, a growing number of patients must contend with the difficulties of stoma management. However, with guidance from a health care professional, stoma patients can live healthy, active lives while minimizing their risk of injury, infection, and other problems.1

Blog Category: 
Holly Hovan's picture
peroperative ostomy siting

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

When marking a patient for a stoma, it is important to consider the practice based on evidence acquired by the wound, ostomy and continence (WOC) nurse during training and experience. Stoma siting procedures are based on evidence-based practices:

Hy-Tape International's picture
preventative skin care - ostomy management

by Hy-Tape International

Prevention is one of the most important components of wound and ostomy care. Factors such as hydration, pressure, excessive moisture, cleanliness, and erythema can all affect wound healing rate, patient comfort, and the incidence of new wounds. By taking a proactive stance, health care professionals can reduce the risk of infection, reduce costs, and improve patient outcomes.1

Blog Category: 
Diana Gallagher's picture
ostomy care 101

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

In order to teach patients, it is important to have some basic knowledge about ostomies. Sadly, as I shared last month, the majority of nursing students learn very little about ostomies or ostomy management. Most nurses have a good understanding of basic anatomy and physiology so this is not the focus of this blog. Instead, we are going to focus our attention on basic information that every nurse should know and competencies that every nurse should develop in order to provide quality care to their patients.

Diana Gallagher's picture
Ostomy

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

As a CWOCN® (Certified Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse), I have always been surprised that not everyone shared my passion about caring for and about ostomy patients. Ostomy management is one of my chosen specialties. Parents love each of their children and should not have a favorite. Managing multiple specialties is a lot like being a parent. I love each of my specialties for different reasons but, if I were forced to choose only one, caring for ostomy patients would be the winner.