Ostomy Management

Holly Hovan's picture
Ostomy Certification

By Holly M. Hovan, MSN, RN-BC, APRN, CWOCN-AP

As someone who holds tricertification, I often feel as though my ostomy patients are the ones in whose lives I am making the biggest difference. Watching them progress, gain confidence in independent ostomy management, and enjoy their lives once again is one of the best feelings to me!

Holly Hovan's picture
Peristomal Skin Complications

by Holly Hovan MSN, RN-BC, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

As discussed in a prior blog, stoma location is certainly one of the key factors in successful ostomy management and independence with care at home. However, even with proper stoma siting, peristomal skin complications may occur for a variety of reasons. In this blog I discuss a few of the more common peristomal skin complications and tips for management.

Hy-Tape International's picture
Ostomy Care Supplies

by Hy-Tape International

Ostomy surgery is an increasingly common treatment for patients with Crohn's disease. With over 450,000 people with stomas in the United States and 120,000 new ostomy surgical procedures performed each year, a growing number of patients must contend with the difficulties of stoma management. However, with guidance from a health care professional, stoma patients can live healthy, active lives while minimizing their risk of injury, infection, and other problems.1

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Holly Hovan's picture
peroperative ostomy siting

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

When marking a patient for a stoma, it is important to consider the practice based on evidence acquired by the wound, ostomy and continence (WOC) nurse during training and experience. Stoma siting procedures are based on evidence-based practices:

Hy-Tape International's picture
preventative skin care - ostomy management

by Hy-Tape International

Prevention is one of the most important components of wound and ostomy care. Factors such as hydration, pressure, excessive moisture, cleanliness, and erythema can all affect wound healing rate, patient comfort, and the incidence of new wounds. By taking a proactive stance, health care professionals can reduce the risk of infection, reduce costs, and improve patient outcomes.1

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Diana Gallagher's picture
ostomy care 101

by Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN
Part 2 in a series focused on ostomy management. For part 1, click here.

Janis Harrison's picture

THE LIFE AND LESSONS OF A WOUND, OSTOMY AND CONTINENCE NURSE, CHAPTER 4

To read the previous chapter, click here.

by Janis E. Harrison, RN, BSN, CWOCN, CFCN

My husband was insistent that I go home the first night he was on the surgical floor. He had a roommate, therefore the hospital policy forbade me to stay the night with him.