Patient Education

Fabiola Jimenez's picture
Nutrition Management

Fabiola Jimenez, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

While I was providing foot care to a patient, one of my coworkers overheard me advising the patient that she will need a lot more protein to heal her wound, and some changes to her diet will be necessary and therefore tighter control of her blood glucose and improved hemoglobin A1c. Later, I was approached by a coworker who told me: "Because you are not a Registered Dietitian, you cannot discuss dietary needs with the patient." I disagree.

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Christine Miller's picture
Coordination of Care

By Christine Miller, DPM, DMM, PhD, FACCWS

One of the gratifying aspects of being a wound care physician is the ability to develop such rich relationships with our patients. The frequent and consistent contact with the same provider lays a strong foundation of open communication and trust. I work in an urban safety net hospital’s ambulatory care center, which sees a high volume of high-acuity patients. It is not uncommon for me to see patients with venous leg ulcerations with concomitant uncontrolled hypertension or diabetic foot ulcerations secondary to uncontrolled blood glucose levels. Patient education is a vital part of my clinical encounters, particularly focusing on the systemic nature of wound healing. I always emphasize that while we are treating your wound, it is the full body well-being that is needed for ultimate success.

Cathy Wogamon's picture
Pilonidal Cyst

By Cathy Wogamon, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, CWON, CFCN

A pilonidal cyst is a pocket located at the top of the cleft of the buttocks that usually results from an embedded or stiff hair. This area may remain dormant for years and cause no major issues; however, often the embedded or stiff hair may cause the cyst to become inflamed and infected, resulting in an abscess that requires incision to drain the infected material. These abscesses can recur, causing the patient to require surgical intervention to remove the cyst. After surgery, some patients tend not to heal well, resulting in a chronic tracking wound in an area that is difficult to heal.

Janet Wolfson's picture
evaluating medical information resources

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

It is hard to read a newspaper (my preferred news source) or an online news site without discovering false information. I recently read an NPR article about how to vet news yourself and how to recognize this.1 The vulnerability I felt made me think about protecting my decisions from this reporting and even more, how I can help my patients weed out fake reports.

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
Patient and Provider

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

As summer gives way to fall, one of the first thoughts most of us have is back to school. Patients and caregivers often feel as though every day is the first day of school and they are being asked to take the final exam before they have learned anything. Learner readiness is the cornerstone of an effective teaching/learning process.

Diana Gallagher's picture
ostomy care 101

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

In order to teach patients, it is important to have some basic knowledge about ostomies. Sadly, as I shared last month, the majority of nursing students learn very little about ostomies or ostomy management. Most nurses have a good understanding of basic anatomy and physiology so this is not the focus of this blog. Instead, we are going to focus our attention on basic information that every nurse should know and competencies that every nurse should develop in order to provide quality care to their patients.

Bruce Ruben's picture

By Robert Striks, Special Writer, Encompass HealthCare & Wound Medicine

There's a funny scene in the Marx Brothers movie, "Horse Feathers," where Chico tells Harpo how to escape from the room they are locked inside by using a rope. Chico instructs Harpo to tie one end of the rope to the bed and then throw the other end of the rope out the window. "Tie on the bed, throw the rope out the window," he repeats. Haplessly, Harpo takes the tie he was wearing around his neck, places it on the bed and then throws the entire escape rope out the window.

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Despite all of the advances in risk assessment strategies, support surfaces, and vigorous educational efforts, pressure ulcers continue to be a major health care problem worldwide.

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Mark Hinkes's picture

em>By Dr. Mark Hinkes, DPM

On June 27, 1991, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and World Health Organization (WHO) proclaimed the first World Diabetes Day. Today, World Diabetes Day is celebrated worldwide as an acknowledgement of the condition, symptoms, complications, treatment and resolve to find a cure for the disease. Participants in the celebration include 230 member associations of the International Diabetes Federation in more than 160 countries and territories. All Member States of the United Nations as well as other associations and organizations, companies, health care professionals and people living with diabetes and their families also observe World Diabetes Day. World Diabetes day will be celebrated on Friday, November 14th this year.

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Michel Hermans's picture

By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

We, the wound care community, are doing it wrong! We are using FDA approved, expensive diagnostics and treatments while the solution for your diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, full-thickness burns and keloid scars are on the web and cost peanuts in comparison to a visit to your doctor.