Patient Outcomes

Holly Hovan's picture
Causes of Incontinence

by Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

With World Continence Week upon us, it is an appropriate time to discuss some types and causes along with treatment of urinary incontinence. Incontinence can have a significant impact on patient quality-of-life and skin health, subjects that will also be discussed.

Holly Hovan's picture
fistula management

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

A fistula is an abnormal opening between two areas that typically shouldn't be connected, or with an epithelialized tract. An example is an opening from the bowel to the abdominal wall, termed enteroatmospheric or enterocutaneous (the terms are sometimes used interchangeably) because this fistula is exposed to the atmosphere, or is open from the abdomen to the skin, and typically needs to be pouched or some type of containment of the effluent.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
necrotic tissue in wound

by the WoundSource Editors

Biofilm is a complex microbial community containing self- and surface-attached microorganisms that are embedded in an extracellular polymeric substance.1,2 The extracellular polymeric substance is a primarily polysaccharide protective matrix synthesized and secreted by the microorganisms that attaches the biofilm firmly to a living or non-living surface. This protective covering does not allow the body's immune system to recognize the presence of the microorganism; therefore, the bacteria evade an immune response, avoid detection by standard diagnostic techniques, and avoid destruction by standard treatments.3 Because of the tenacity of the attached biofilm, the microoganisms are able to resist physical forces, such shear, and are able to withstand nutrient and moisture deprivation, altered pH, and the impact of antibiotics and antiseptics. For the purposes of this discussion we break down the formation and actions of biofilms and discuss their impact on wound healing.

Tissue Analytics's picture
wound care assessment system

By Amanda Steinhauser, LVN, WCC

Everyone has heard the numbers; wound care costs in the United States are reported to be in excess of fifty billion dollars annually. Moreover, more than six million Americans suffer from chronic wounds. According to the American Diabetes Association, over one million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year. Despite these jaw-dropping statistics, wound care assessment techniques remain, for the majority, one of the most antiquated parts of health care.

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Janet Wolfson's picture
patient interview questions

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

I was recently listening to one of my favorite news sources, NPR, enjoying an interview with James E. Ryan, the author of "Wait, What? - and Life's Other Essential Questions". The premise was that asking the right questions can lead to a happier and more successful life. A physician called in to relate that this was something he had been doing in his medical practice. I couldn't have agreed more – the questions I ask my patients (and then listening to their answers) can go a long way toward making an intervention in their health care more successful.

Janet Wolfson's picture
preventing-pressure-injuries

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

As I read through wound care articles on pressure injuries and treatments, I keep going back to one thought: why are they still occurring? They are preventable! Staff are educated, have certifications and equipment, and have been oriented on policy to prevent pressure injuries. I think it comes down to opportunities and choices.

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Margaret Heale's picture
personalized medicine

Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

"Personalized medicine" is apparently a new concept that has evolved from taking good family histories, then adding a genetic testing component. The idea is to help assess the risk of specific traits that may be evident, and confirm with genetic testing so people can make lifestyle changes that reduce risk. It has attracted a huge amount of attention over the past few years.

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Terri Kolenich's picture
the-continuum-of-wound-care

By Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

Have you ever confronted yourself with thoughts of how your role plays into the grand scheme of wound care? I am sure any wound nurse or physician would quickly answer "of course!" – since the role of a direct caregiver is so blaringly obvious.

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