Pressure Injuries

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Palliative Care

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure Injury/Ulcer Risk Management in Palliative Care and Hospice

Palliative care and hospice care are not the same, but they both share one goal. They both focus on a patient's physical, mental, social, and spiritual needs. Palliative care can begin at diagnosis and treatment or for patients at any stage of their illness. Patients may not want to receive aggressive treatment of non-healing wounds because of underlying diseases, pain, and/or cost.1

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By the WoundSource Editors

Adherence – A term used to replace “compliance” in reference to a patient following clinician orders for wound care. The updated term reflects patient choice in treatment recommendations.

Bottoming Out – A support surface has bottomed out if the clinician is able to place their hand under the support surface and is then able to palpate the bony prominence the support surface is meant to be protecting. The surface should be replaced immediately if this occurs.

Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk© – A risk assessment tool commonly used in the United States to determine the likelihood of an adult patient developing a pressure injury. The lower the score, the more at risk the patient is. For pediatric patients, the Braden Q Scale is used.

Susan Cleveland's picture
Support Surfaces for Special Populations

By Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

Part 2 in a two-part series looking at the basics of correctly using support surfaces to help redistribute pressure. Read Part 1 here.

Cathy Wogamon's picture
Veteran with Spinal Cord Injury

By Cathy Wogamon, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, CWON, CFCN

Immobility and decreased sensation can cause major problems related to the skin in the patient with spinal cord injury. Even though the average age of the veteran with a spinal cord injury is increasing, there are still many younger veterans affected by spinal cord injuries. When skin issues arise in this population, the impact is not only physical but also emotional as skin issues sometimes make it difficult for the veteran to remain in their chairs, thereby decreasing mobility and socialization.

Susan Cleveland's picture
Support Surfaces

By Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

Part 1 in a two-part series looking at the basics of correctly using support surfaces to help redistribute pressure. Read Part 2 here.

Nancy Munoz's picture
Nutrition Management

by Dr. Nancy Munoz, DCN, MHA, RDN, FAND

The presence of diabetes can have a negative impact on wound healing rates. Increased glucose levels can stiffen the arteries and contribute to narrowing of the blood vessels. This can influence pressure injury development and is a risk factor for impaired wound healing.

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