Risk Factors

Michel Hermans's picture
Medication

By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

Undertreatment of medical issues is not necessarily bad: palliative care usually only treats symptoms but not the underlying cause of the symptoms which, if the patient wants this, is very appropriate. Remember, Hippocrates said something about suffering and while a disease may be not curable, suffering quite often may be treated with proper medication or other interventions (though, unfortunately, this is not always the case). We should not be worried to give somebody with terminal illness and in serious pain the proper type and amount of medication, even if there is a chance the patient would get addicted.

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
toothbrushes

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

While the focus of nutrition interventions for wound healing involve the amount of protein, calories and beverages provided and consumed, we tend to forget the importance of good oral hygiene.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Braden Scale

By Aletha Tippett MD

I was recently asked to speak on best practices for prevention of pressure ulcers for a group of state surveyors. This is an excellent subject and here is how I would address it:

WoundSource Editors's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Litigation over hospital-acquired pressure ulcers represents a significant fraction of a medical malpractice attorney's caseload. The liability issues have shifted since October 1, 2008 when the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and several private payers began denying reimbursement for care related to hospital-acquired stage III and IV pressure ulcer. Prior to October 2008, the experts battled over whether a pressure ulcer was avoidable. Now, they still do, but plaintiff attorneys and their experts can point to the government's stance that pressure ulcers are avoidable, "never events". Defense experts must assert that everything possible was done to avoid the ulcer, or it was not really caused by pressure.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
Image from the National Cancer Institute

By the WoundSource Editors

A myriad of factors need to be addressed when evaluating a patient with a wound. A thorough patient history, including previous wounds, surgeries, hospitalizations, and past and existing conditions will help guide your clinical assessment, in addition to a number of questions specific to the wound(s) being assessed. Following is a list of general questions to ask when evaluating a wound care patient. (Please note that this list is not comprehensive and is intended only to serve as a guide):

WoundSource Editors's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

The term diabetic foot refers generally to the increased occurrence of complications in the feet of patients with diabetes mellitus. The most common foot problems related to diabetes are peripheral neuropathy leading to ulceration, vascular disease, increased risk of infection, and deformities like Charcot arthropathy. Complications arising from diabetes are the most common non-traumatic injury to cause lower extremity amputation.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

Health care professionals recognize there seem to be 'seasons' for certain diseases and conditions. Spring and fall see a rise in flare ups of gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and seasonal allergies. Summer months bring an increase in traumatic events such as drownings, gunshot wounds and automobile accidents. Development of pressure ulcers does not follow a seasonal pattern—they occur at a higher than acceptable frequency throughout the year.

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Mark Hinkes's picture

By Dr. Mark Hinkes, DPM

I recently read a synopsis about how Obamacare will affect the type of health care services that will be available in the marketplace and the age groups that will be helped and hurt the most by this new law.1 Not really knowing much about Obamacare, I read the article and ended up feeling deeply disturbed and shocked at what Mr. Obama and the Congress have unleashed upon us. The news is not good for patients with wounds and for those who practice wound care.

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Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Pressure ulcer risk assessment is crucial to the prevention of pressure ulcers. There are many factors which put certain patients at higher risk of developing these painful injuries that increase health care costs and lead to prolonged hospitalization, and sometimes death.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer, RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The past few months my blog has been devoted to illustrating the value of using an etiology-based approach to diagnosing adult malnutrition in clinical settings. This approach is detailed in The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.): Characteristics Recommended for the Identification and Documentation of Adult Malnutrition (Undernutrition).

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