Risk Factors

Hy-Tape International's picture
Management Strategies for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

By Hy-Tape International

According to a published study, the global prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is 6.3%, with male patients and older adults being the most likely to be affected.1 This prevalence, coupled with the potential for complications and the severe effect on quality of life the condition can have, makes DFUs one of today's most serious health care issues. To reduce the effects of DFUs and improve outcomes for patients, it is critical that health care professionals rapidly identify DFUs and implement best practice dressing and management strategies.

Kelly Byrd-Jenkins's picture
Pressure Ulcer Reduction in Acute Care

by Kelly Byrd-Jenkins, CWS

It may come as no surprise to some, but pressure ulcers are among the only hospital-acquired conditions that have been on the rise in recent years. Other hospital-acquired conditions—such as adverse drug events, falls, and catheter-associated urinary tract infections—have decreased, according to a statement by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality in January of this year.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Factors Contributing to Complex Wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

A vast percentage of wounds become chronically stalled because of mixed etiology and other underlying comorbid medical conditions. This means the wound is multifactorial, and using a singular approach won’t be enough. Lower extremity wounds, for example, can have diabetes, venous and arterial issues, and pressure all as factors playing into the same wound.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Complex Wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

Complex wounds pose a significant challenge for many health care providers. These wounds are often multifaceted, making treatment tremendously difficult. They represent a substantial burden on the health care industry, with annual costs in North America alone estimated at $10 billion annually. They often also result in patient discomfort and pain, caregiver frustration, individual economic losses, and diminished quality of life.

Fabiola Jimenez's picture
Skin Care

By Fabiola Jimenez, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

Have you noticed the tissue trauma that occurs to the posterior aspect of the scrotum? It appears like road rash, partial tissue loss, and denudation. Many times it is weepy, and looks it appears quite painful to the patient.

Heidi Cross's picture
Unavoidable Pressure Ulcers

By Heidi Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

"At all times material hereto, defendant failed to develop an adequate care plan and properly monitor and supervise the care and treatment in order to prevent her from suffering the development and deterioration of bed sores."

Holly Hovan's picture
Braden Scale: Mobility

By Holly Hovan, MSN, RN-BC, APRN-CNS, CWOCN-AP

What is mobility? Typically, when we hear the word mobility, we think about our ability to move, with or without assistance. In a long-term care setting, we often hear the words, "mobility aids," which are typically pieces of medical equipment that are used to enhance mobility—wheelchairs, walkers, canes, power wheelchairs, crutches, and even guide dogs for those who are sight impaired. There are many intrinsic and extrinsic factors that impact one's mobility, which will be discussed in this blog.

Heidi Cross's picture
Risk Factors for Unavoidable Ulcers

by Heidi H. Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, more than 17,000 lawsuits related to pressure ulcers (PUs) are filed annually in the United States, second only to wrongful death lawsuits. One of the greatest gifts to defense attorneys was when the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published F-Tag 314, finally acknowledging that some ulcers can occur despite best care. The facility essentially can maintain, “Hey, we did everything we were supposed to, and despite that, the patient developed that pressure ulcer”—that is, the ulcer was unavoidable. To prove unavoidability, proper documentation (proof) of best care needs to be in place, as well as documentation that all proper prevention and treatment measures were implemented.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

Those working with at-risk populations must be aware of how to address the skin care needs of our patients and prevent pressure ulcers and injuries. At-risk populations, such as older adults, persons who are incontinent, pediatric patients, immobile patients, post-operative patients, and those with chronic disease processes and spinal injuries, for example, are most at risk for developing pressure ulcers. Those patients who have comorbidities such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease are at additional risk.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

The skin is the largest organ of our body, covering 18 square feet and weighing approximately 12 pounds. Despite positive characteristics, the skin is always susceptible to and at risk of injury and breakdown. Maintaining skin integrity equals maintaining skin health, and this includes people of any age. Older adults are at a higher risk because of the skin aging process. As skin ages, the junction between the epidermis and dermis thins and flattens, reducing circulation. Moisturizing factors in older adults also reduce, thus causing dry, flaky skin and increased risk of skin breakdown.