Wound Bed Preparation

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Wound Bed Assessment

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound treatment plans are frequently ineffective because of a widespread failure to identify wound etiology accurately. One study found that up to 30% of all wounds lack a differential diagnosis, and this poses a real barrier to administering effective treatments. Furthermore, recent advances in the understanding of wounds, including the use of growth factors and bioengineered tissue and the ability to grow cells in vitro, present new opportunities to provide more effective treatment. Wound bed preparation that incorporates the TIME framework (tissue management, Infection or inflammation, moisture imbalance, and edge of wound) into the A, B, C, D, E wound bed preparation care cycle can significantly increase the ability to perform the following accurately.

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Multidisciplinary Team

By the WoundSource Editors

The prevalence of non-healing wounds is a challenge and concern for all levels of health care professionals. Clinical evidence has proven that using a multidisciplinary team approach to wound care is key in providing quality of care across the continuum. Clinicians should keep the mindset of always viewing the patient as a whole. A multidisciplinary team consists of members from many different disciplines using their areas of expertise to focus on the wound care patient. Bringing the knowledge and skills together of the wound team will provide guidance to better clinical, health, and financial outcomes.

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Tissue Debridement

By the WoundSource Editors

The concept of wound bed preparation has been utilized and accepted for over two decades. Wound bed preparation techniques can only be accurately employed after a thorough and complete assessment of the wound. Poor assessments result in a negative impact of needless costs and truancy of appropriate treatments and outcomes. The goal of wound bed preparation is to provide an optimal wound healing environment. Up-to-date research in molecular science has helped evolve new technology and advanced therapies that include growth factors, growing cells in vitro, and developing bioengineered tissue. Researchers now know that the healing process involves an array of elements that require monitoring and attentiveness.

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Wound Bed Preparation for Chronic Wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound bed preparation is a well-established concept, and the TIME framework is the standard tool used to assist clinicians with the management of patients’ wounds throughout the care cycle. Recent clinical and technological breakthroughs are enhancing our understanding of this care cycle. An overview of the wound bed preparation care cycle and the TIME framework is provided here.

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Debridement Methods

By the WoundSource Editors

A wound specialist’s job is to outline the options available for treatment. It is the patient’s job to choose a treatment option. Patients do not even have to select the best option. They must choose an option that works for them given their unique circumstances having a wound. When it comes to selecting debridement methods there are several options to choose from. This article will provide an overview of the most common debridement methods.

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Wound Tissue

by the WoundSource Editors

Successful utilization of the TIME model for wound bed preparation requires a working knowledge of chronic wound tissue types. In addition, building on this foundational knowledge is the development of accurate wound assessment skills. These components combined will assist the clinician in implementing the appropriate interventions for each wound.

Viable Chronic Wound Tissue Types

The term "viable" describes vascular tissue with dynamic biological activity.

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Moisture Management

by the WoundSource Editors

Before embarking on the journey of wound bed preparation, the goals for wound care should be carefully considered. A realistic look at the goals and expectations from the perspective of the patient as well as the wound care team is the first step in developing and implementing the appropriate plan of care.