Dressings

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Elliot Fialkoff and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Ulcers, wounds, and burns come in many different shapes and sizes based in part on their etiology, which also varies dramatically. As many different etiologies as there are for various dermatological insults, there is an even greater number of dressings and treatment options available. DuoDERM® Hydrocolloid is an occlusive gel dressing that helps maintain a moist wound bed. According to the ConvaTec website (the maker of DuoDERM®), "On contact with wound exudate, the hydrocolloid matrix forms a cohesive gel which supports moist wound healing."

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Brittany Charmaine Sumpter and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Drawtex™ wound dressings utilize a hydroconductive material to aid the clinician in wound bed preparation. It is a highly absorbent wound dressing that facilitates the movement of wound exudates into and through the dressing to the outer secondary material. The constant movement of wound fluids clears the wound bed of harmful wound byproducts that may slow down or prevent wound healing.

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Colton Mason's picture

Part 1 in a series exploring the latest innovations in soft silicone wound care dressings

For decades now due to a patent, the only real option for soft silicone dressings existed with one company. Recently, that patent has expired. What does this mean for you? Simply put – new products and better values. Over the next few weeks, I will show you some of my favorite new soft silicone dressings and encourage you to evaluate and compare their features and performance to your current brand of choice.

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Karen Zulkowski's picture

By Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

Back in 2012, I blogged about glove change and hand washing during dressing change frequency and hand washing during dressing changes. Your comments were very informative. It is sad that facilities are being cited for not changing gloves, and rewashing and sanitizing hands during a dressing change. There is no evidence this does anything but add to the cost. What's important is to protect yourself from the patient's bacteria.

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Lydia Corum's picture

By Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

What is a wound care patient?

A wound care patient is a person with an open area that is not healing. I hear wound care patients referred to as: the pressure ulcer, the hip wounds, the one that has legs that always smell like urine, the amputee that is going to lose the other leg, the non-compliant with the chronic wound, the drug addict. Where in nursing did we lose that perspective of the person behind the disease or illness? These are people with wounds that require our best effort in order to heal. They need our loving care, our education, and our assurance that all will be well.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

In 1771, Luigi Galvani discovered that the muscles of a frog leg contracted when touched by a spark. This spawned the beginning of our understanding of the relationship between electricity and electrical stimulation and its effect and use on the human body. One thing that is often overlooked when caring for wounds is the impact that electricity can have on wound healing. It is used in the form of electrical stimulation, most often applied by a physical therapist. In her wonderful book, Wound Care: A Collaborative Practice Manual for Health Professionals, Dr. Carrie Sussman provides the rationale and procedures for using electrical stimulation to promote wound healing.

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Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Dressing changes can be painful experiences for clients. Pain is often not addressed or may be addressed inadequately. Pain is a significant issue for many clients and can present a challenge to the treating practitioner.

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Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

We've all experienced difficulty in getting dressings to stay on for as long as we need them to, especially when there are many commercial dressings that could (and should) remain in place for several days before they require changing.

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Beth Hawkins Bradley's picture

By Beth Hawkins Bradley RN, MN, CWON

Finding the key to unlocking a non-healing chronic wound keeps us awake at night. Though we have, as bedside clinicians, learned much about the physiology and biochemistry of chronic wounds over the past decade, wound healing is not an exact science. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has become standard care for certain chronic wounds. Sometimes, however, wounds treated with this therapy do not progress as readily as we think that they should. This has led us to consider combining other wound care products with NPWT. This article will examine the rationale for using three products in combination with negative pressure.

Sue Hull's picture

By Sue Hull MSN, RN, CWOCN

Here is an idea you will love!

What do you do with a blister? You know the problem. You discover a blister. If you don’t do anything, it will probably unroof and be open and vulnerable by the next time you see it.

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