Dressings

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Wound Care Journal Club Review

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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Margaret Heale's picture
dressing removal

By Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

Wounds are dressed every day, and much goes into the choices that are made to properly apply wound dressings. The condition of the periwound skin should be a major factor in the decisions made, as injuring this area can extend the wound and cause considerable pain. Tape removal is one of the most painful areas of wound care.1

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Margaret Heale's picture
Medical supply waste

By Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

Like many people, you might go to recycling every month or so and be proud to deliver a few black bags of rubbish, and recycle most everything else. Many of you may have a thriving compost heap (mine is frequented by the biggest and fattest groundhog in the universe who eats produce instead of garbage). Like me, you might think of yourself as a responsible dweller of planet earth.

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Jeffrey M. Levine's picture
wound care product ingredients

By Jeffrey Levine MD

While I’m on rounds with students I like to ask, "What is the active ingredient of hydrogel?" My query is usually met with puzzled looks. It's a trick question, because the term "active ingredient" generally applies to pharmacologic agents that undergo metabolic change in biologic systems. The active ingredient of hydrogel which gives this substance its name is water. Compounds are added to thicken the mixture and provide viscosity, such as glycerine. Other ingredients common in cosmetics, such as aloe vera, methyl paraben, hydrogenated castor oil, and propyl paraben, are added to hydrogel depending on the manufacturer.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Zinc in wound healing

By Aletha Tippett MD

Well, what a surprise to find that what you have been doing all along is really the right thing to do even though you didn’t know the reason. Always, over the years doing wound care, I applied a thick layer of zinc oxide ointment around the patient’s wound, then put my dressing on the wound and covered it with a topping, usually plastic wrap pressed into the zinc oxide ointment.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
balancing choice with outcomes

By Aletha Tippett MD

How do you know if you are making right choice for a patient? Or, how do you know if you are even making a choice? This is true in the world of limb salvage. I have witnessed too many patients for which the risk of amputation was too much, and they died. But how do you know what the outcome will really be? You never really know, but you can make your best guess.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
chicken egg use in wound healing

By Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
making wound product selection decisions

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Whether you are a provider or a clinician, the challenge of wound dressing selection is ongoing. I have been an educator for quite some time now, and have found that the easiest way to teach dressing selection is by dressing category and wound depth.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
honey treatment and wounds

By Aletha Tippett MD

How often have you thought about using honey in a wound dressing? Never? In twenty years of wound care, honey was always something that could be used – sometimes by itself on a wound, or sometimes with other dressing material used on a wound.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
the final stage of wound healing

By the WoundSource Editors

Moist wound healing is the practice of keeping a wound in an optimally moist environment in order to promote faster healing. Research has shown that moist wound healing is three to five times quicker than the healing of wounds that are allowed to dry out.

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