Dressings

Cheryl Carver's picture
advanced bioactive wound technologies

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

The growing market for bioactive wound care products has been very interesting and exciting to me. I have been involved the past couple years as an anonymous wound panel expert, council member, and consultant for upcoming bioactive wound care dressing research. We will start seeing an increase in various biomaterials, versus gauze and superabsorbent dressing types used globally. Multifunctional-type dressings will also make waves.

Blog Category: 
WoundSource Editors's picture
occlusive dressing

By the WoundSource Editors

Occlusive dressings are used for sealing particular types of wounds and their surrounding tissue off from air, fluids and harmful contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, in a trauma or first aid situation. They are often utilized as an immediate means of controlling the cleanliness of a wound as well as the loss of blood until surgery can be used for long-term treatment. Although no wound dressing can provide complete seal, the waxy, non-absorbent nature of occlusive dressings are often enough. The quality of the provided seal often depends on factors such as the skill of the person dressing the wound, the nature of the wound and the condition of the area around the wound. Health care professionals are trained in the application of this kind of dressing, but the task is sometimes taken on by a patient's long-term caregiver.

Blog Category: 
Terri Kolenich's picture
frequently asked wound care treatment questions

By Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

I travel to several states educating wound care providers and nurses in the long-term care setting. Many of the questions I get are the same whether I'm on the east or west coast. The one question that I encounter the most often during wound rounds or an education session is: "How do I know which treatment to use for this wound?"

Blog Category: 
WoundSource Editors's picture
hydrocolloid dressing for wounds - granuflex border dressing

By the WoundSource Editors

Hydrocolloid dressings provide a moist and insulating healing environment which protects uninfected wounds while allowing the body's own enzymes to help heal wounds. These dressings are unique because they don't have to be changed as often as some other wound dressings and are easy to apply. Hydrocolloid dressings:

Blog Category: 
Cheryl Carver's picture
wet-to-dry dressing changes using gauze

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

The big debate continues in regards to using wet-to-dry dressings. One thing that is for certain though is that this type of dressing is frowned upon in long-term care facilities per the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) Guidelines for pressure ulcers. However, long-term care facilities are put at risk for citations when using wet-to-dry dressings for any wound type.

Blog Category: 
Michel Hermans's picture
monitoring the healing time of partial-thickness burns

By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

Recently I paid a visit to one of the better known wound care centers in the North East. As I expected, treatment of the common lesions seen in this center, such as venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers, was top notch. The use of compression and offloading, proper wound debridement and modern dressings (including, where indicated, biologics and matrices), in combination with the option for vascular, plastic and orthopedic (i.e. for Charcot foot) reconstruction resulted in good healing results, with high percentages of reepithelialization within a relatively short time frame.

Laurie Swezey's picture
aerobic proteus bacteria in a wound

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Activated charcoal has been used in various types of wound care dressings. Although activated charcoal in itself does not enhance wound healing, it can help to minimize the odors associated with wounds. This is important, as wound odor can be very distressing for the patient, and the patient's family and caregivers. Wound odor can impact the quality of life of individuals with strong, persistent wound odor to have feelings of embarrassment, depression and isolation.1

Blog Category: 
Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
Wound Management Technology

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

What's the best approach to wound management: use of the latest advanced technology or "back to basics" treatment methods? How many times have you, the experienced wound clinician, been asked this question? It is only natural for people (especially patients and their families) to gravitate to a solution that seems to offer a quick fix for a very complex problem.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Wound Care Literature Review

By Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Blog Category: 
Samantha Kuplicki's picture
DME products

By Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, AGCNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Ordering wound care dressing supplies can prove to be a frustrating task for many providers and clinicians. Unfortunately, I have encountered many health care providers that describe feelings of dread when working with their durable medical equipment (DME) counterparts.

Blog Category: