Foot Care

WoundSource Editors's picture
diabetic foot ulcer treatment

Estimates are that by 2030 there will be 550 million individuals with diabetes in the world. Because almost a quarter of all people with diabetes will develop a foot ulcer at some point, health care workers need to know the best practices for diabetic foot ulcer prevention and treatment.

Determining which diabetic foot ulcer type is important to determine an effective treatment. Here are the different types of these wounds:

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
WoundSource journal club blog

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Mark Hinkes's picture
leg bones

by Dr. Mark Hinkes, DPM

Unequal limb length (ULL) is a clinical problem that is more common than most clinicians realize and is one for which most patients are rarely evaluated. Common problems associated with unequal limb length include instability in gait, falling, low back pain, sciatica, joint pain, IT Band Syndrome, chronic muscle strain, tendonitis, and failure of diabetic foot wounds to heal.

WoundSource Editors's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

The term diabetic foot refers generally to the increased occurrence of complications in the feet of patients with diabetes mellitus. The most common foot problems related to diabetes are peripheral neuropathy leading to ulceration, vascular disease, increased risk of infection, and deformities like Charcot arthropathy. Complications arising from diabetes are the most common non-traumatic injury to cause lower extremity amputation.

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Bruce Ruben's picture

by Bruce E. Ruben MD

Part 2 in a series on infection management
For Part 1, click here

Our skin is our largest organ and performs a myriad of functions, including pain sensation, pressure sensitivity, temperature regulation and water conservation.

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Mark Hinkes's picture

by Dr. Mark Hinkes, DPM

Twenty first century technology is helping people with diabetes to heal foot ulcers. An Australian colleague, for example, is developing an application that reminds people with diabetes to control their blood sugars with prompts and instructions, and allows them to upload a picture of their wound for their podiatrist to evaluate.

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Margaret Heale's picture

Perspective of Nursing Care from Past to Future by Matron Marley

by Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN