Skin Care

Hy-Tape International's picture
Stomas and Periwound Skin

by Hy-Tape International

Stomas can cause significant difficulties for patients and health care professionals by degrading patients’ quality of life and making it difficult to stay active. Peristomal skin complications are particularly problematic and can lead to a wide range of problems and discomfort for patients. To reduce the risk of these issues, it is critical that health care professionals understand these complications and take steps to help patients minimize their risk.

Blog Category: 
Hy-Tape International's picture
Skin Tear

by Hy-Tape International

Skin tears are a costly and increasingly common condition affecting a large number of patients, particularly older adults. These injuries can be caused by excessive friction, shearing, or blunt forces, causing a partial- or full-thickness wound. Although they are generally considered to be minor injuries, skin tears can lead to more serious complications and exacerbate existing wounds. To ensure that the costs of skin tears do not become too great, and that patients stay healthy, it is critical that health care professionals understand the risks of skin tearing and take preventative action to reduce those risks.

Holly Hovan's picture
Medical Device-Related Injury

by Holly M. Hovan, MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

As specialists in wound, continence and ostomy care, we are we are forever in a role of wearing many hats. We are educators to patients, staff, and providers… we are patient advocates and supporters of our bedside nurses… we are liaisons in many aspects of care and help to coordinate care and services for our patient population. We are often referred to as the specialist and are called upon when there is a patient with a wound, skin, ostomy, or continence concern. Our peers trust us, and it is important that we possess the knowledge and skills to share with others when determining etiology and treatment of wounds and skin issues.

Blog Category: 
Sharon Baronoski's picture
Obesity

by Sharon Baranoski, MSN, RN, CWCN, APN-CCNS, FAAN and Kimberly LeBlanc, PhD, RN, WOCC©, IIWCC

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that in the United States, "...thirty eight percent of adults, and that seventeen percent of children and teens are obese." It is imperative that the term obesity be differentiated from overweight. Obesity refers to higher than normal body fat, whereas overweight is in reference to an individual weighing more than the standard for height and weight. Although both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what is considered healthy for his or her height, obesity has higher negative health-related consequences.

Fabiola Jimenez's picture
Nurses communicating about patient

by Fabiola Jimenez, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

To tell you the truth, I was not exactly sure what I was getting into when I decided to go to Wound Ostomy and Continence (WOC) nursing school. My reference was my experience during my Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) clinical rotations where I worked with a colorectal surgeon and the Nurse Practitioner (NP). The patients we saw had everything to do with a WOC’s expected body of knowledge.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
moisture-associated skin damage

by the WoundSource Editors

It has long been known in clinical practice that long-term exposure of the skin to moisture is harmful and can lead to extensive skin breakdown. The term moisture-associated skin damage was coined as an umbrella term to describe the spectrum of skin damage that can occur over time and under various circumstances. To have a moisture-associated skin condition, there must be moisture that comes in contact with that skin.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
incontinence-associate dermatitis prevention

by the WoundSource Editors

Although clinical practice is hampered by a lack of rigorous studies, standardized terminology, or definitions of incontinence-associated skin damage, it is well known among health care providers that this damage places patients at increased risk for pressure ulcer/injury development.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
complications associated with MASD

by the WoundSource Editors

Best practice in skin care focuses on the prevention of skin breakdown and the treatment of persons with altered skin integrity. When we ask what causes skin damage we should consider the conditions that can harm the skin, including excessive moisture and overhydration, altered pH of the skin, the presence of fecal enzymes and pathogens, and characteristics of incontinence such as the volume and frequency of the output and whether the output is urine, feces, or both

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
repositioning for pressure injury prevention

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure ulcers/injuries are extremely prevalent, particularly in long-term and other care facilities, and primarily affect older adults, those with cognitive impairment, mobility issues or individuals who are bedfast. Understanding the best ways to prevent skin damage before it develops into a significant injury is critical to improving patient outcomes and reducing costs.1 This brief guide will introduce nurses and other health care professionals to pressure injury prevention best practices to reduce the risk of patients’ developing these preventable wounds.

Holly Hovan's picture
elderly patient skin tear prevention

Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

I'm sure you're all familiar with the terms "prednisone skin," "thin skin," "fragile skin," or "easily bruises." One or all of these phrases are commonly used to describe our geriatric population's aging skin. As we age, so does our skin. Skin loses elasticity and often gains wrinkles. Skin conditions that were maybe never present throughout life can crop up with aging. Keep in mind that the environment and different exposures (to sunlight, smoking, and stress) can cause our skin to age differently.

Blog Category: