Support Surfaces

Ivy Razmus's picture
Wheelchairs and Pressure Injuries

By Ivy Razmus, RN, PhD, CWOCN

People in wheelchairs are limited in their mobility, sensory perception, and activity. These limitations can lead to increased temperature and moisture on the areas that are in contact with the wheelchair surface. These risk factors place wheelchair users at a higher risk for pressure injuries. A pressure injury is localized damage to the skin and underlying soft tissue, usually over a bony prominence or related to a medical or other device. Pressure from medical devices against the skin may also cause pressure injury. Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and its associated comorbidities are among the highest-risk population for developing pressure injuries. The incidence of pressure ulcers in patients with SCI is 25%–66%.

Blog Category: 
Industry News's picture

McDonough, GA, June 23, 2019 – Encompass Group, LLC premiered its transformative new Airisana™ Therapeutic Support Surface in its exhibit booth at the WOCNext 2019 Conference in Nashville, Tennessee. Airisana™ is a unique, never-before-seen approach to pressure management therapy and microclimate. By combining all of the best practices devised to reduce health care-acquired pressure injuries into one surface and control unit, it replaces up to five other surface types.

Blog Category: 
Industry News's picture

by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel

Washington, DC. – March 7, 2019 – On February 15, 2019, the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) approved a revision to the ANSI/RESNA SS-1-2014 standard. The revision includes 4 new test methods to evaluate important performance characteristics of support surfaces, including mattresses, mattress overlays, and integrated bed systems related to the prevention and treatment of pressure injuries. This National standard has been developed by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) Support Surface Standards Initiate (S3I) and is available through RESNA (https://www.resna.org/standards/support-surfaces/support-surfaces).

Blog Category: 
Susan Cleveland's picture
Keywords: 

By Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

So, you’ve selected the support surface that is perfect for the resident. What’s next? Next steps: education, utilization, reassessment, and repeat. So many questions! Remember, as I have said before, nothing here is common sense, only common knowledge. It is your responsibility to make sure the staff left in charge of the direct care of residents has that knowledge. Think basics!

Blog Category: 
Susan Cleveland's picture
Support Surfaces for Special Populations

By Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

Part 2 in a two-part series looking at the basics of correctly using support surfaces to help redistribute pressure. Read Part 1 here.

Blog Category: 
Susan Cleveland's picture
Support Surfaces

By Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

Part 1 in a two-part series looking at the basics of correctly using support surfaces to help redistribute pressure. Read Part 2 here.

Blog Category: 
Industry News's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Chicago, IL – October 23, 2017 – Global medical technology company Hill-Rom (NYSE: HRC) today announced the launch of a new medical-surgical bed solution for hospitals that offers optimized patient safety, enhanced patient satisfaction and advanced caregiver-focused technology. The new Hill-Rom® Centrella™ Smart+ bed is available now in the U.S., and in Canada in November.

Blog Category: 
Aletha Tippett MD's picture
support surface technology and pressure injury prevention

Bby Aletha Tippett MD

The idea that pressure injuries (ulcers) can be prevented through equipment or device technology is one we must challenge as clinicians. A manufacturer of support surfaces, for example, may try to tell us that their beds, technologically superior, will prevent pressure injuries from forming.

Blog Category: 
Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

The great medical pioneer, Dr. Paul Brand, was right when he said it's not about medicine, it's about mechanics. Think of the ulcers you are asked to see and treat. I hope the first question you ask about any wound is "how did this get here?" If the mechanics of a wound are not addressed, the medicine will not be successful.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

Once the individual has been thoroughly assessed for palliative care and his or her objectives and needs have been discussed, the wound care provider must determine the wound management strategy to follow. This strategy will depend upon the type of wound being treated for palliation. A summary of each type of wound and an appropriate palliative strategy are listed below, including factors such as removal of the wound cause, pain and drainage management, and odor control:

Blog Category: