Dressings

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Alginate: Highly absorptive, non-occlusive dressing derived from brown seaweed or kelp.

Antimicrobial dressing: Delivers a sustained release of antimicrobial agents to the wound, to eradicate bioburden.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Wound Dressing Selection

by the WoundSource Editors

Do you, as a wound care clinician, know the ingredients of the dressings you are using on your patients? Do you know brand names, or do you know dressing categories? There are over 6,000 dressings, and we as clinicians cannot possibly learn about every dressing. However, learning the categories of dressings, along with indications, can help simplify the puzzle. You first want to ask yourself what you are trying to do. Absorb exudate or donate moisture? Is there a biofilm contained in the wound? Is there a formulation or composition of the dressing that would work best?

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Wound Dressing Selection

by the WoundSource Editors

Dressing selections can be overwhelming for clinicians and providers in health care. There are now well over 6,000 wound care products on the market. Ideally, there would be a multifunctional smart dressing that could “do it all” readily available in all settings. Unfortunately, we as health care providers know, that definitely isn’t the case.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Chronic Wound Tissue

by The WoundSource Editors

To witness the normal wound healing process is extraordinary. However, the systematic process of healing is not always perfect. Chronic wounds are complex and present an immense burden in health care. Identifying the wound etiology is important, but an accurate wound assessment is just as important. The color, consistency, and texture of wound tissue will lead you to the most appropriate wound management plan.

WoundSource Editors's picture
healing with alginate dressing

What is an Alginate Dressing?

Biodegradable alginate dressings made from seaweed date back at least fifty years and commercially available alginate has been available since 1983. Often used on wounds with heavy exudate, the alginates used to produce these dressings are made from a variety of seaweeds harvested around the world. Arguably underused, these dressings are not well studied and documented in the medical literature compared to other modern dressings.

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Jeffrey M. Levine's picture
wound care product ingredients

by Jeffrey Levine MD

While I’m on rounds with students I like to ask, "What is the active ingredient of hydrogel?" My query is usually met with puzzled looks. It's a trick question, because the term "active ingredient" generally applies to pharmacologic agents that undergo metabolic change in biologic systems. The active ingredient of hydrogel which gives this substance its name is water. Compounds are added to thicken the mixture and provide viscosity, such as glycerine. Other ingredients common in cosmetics, such as aloe vera, methyl paraben, hydrogenated castor oil, and propyl paraben, are added to hydrogel depending on the manufacturer.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
chicken egg use in wound healing

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
making wound product selection decisions

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Whether you are a provider or a clinician, the challenge of wound dressing selection is ongoing. I have been an educator for quite some time now, and have found that the easiest way to teach dressing selection is by dressing category and wound depth.

Cheryl Carver's picture
advanced bioactive wound technologies

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

The growing market for bioactive wound care products has been very interesting and exciting to me. I have been involved the past couple years as an anonymous wound panel expert, council member, and consultant for upcoming bioactive wound care dressing research. We will start seeing an increase in various biomaterials, versus gauze and superabsorbent dressing types used globally. Multifunctional-type dressings will also make waves.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
occlusive dressing

Occlusive dressings are used for sealing particular types of wounds and their surrounding tissue off from air, fluids and harmful contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, in a trauma or first aid situation. They are often utilized as an immediate means of controlling the cleanliness of a wound as well as the loss of blood until surgery can be used for long-term treatment.

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