Dressings

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Article Title: Efficacy of Cadexomer Iodine in the Treatment of Chronic Ulcers: A Randomized, Multicenter, Controlled Trial
Authors: Radhakkrishnan R, Kethavath SN, Sangavarapu SM, Kanjarla P, Dexadine Study Group
Journal: Wounds. 2019;31(3):85-90
Reviewed by: Elizabeth Connolly, class of 2021, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Entropic Wound Cycle

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Article Title: Using the Entropic Wound Cycle as the Basic for Making Effective Treatment Choices
Authors: Mcguire, J, Sebag JA, Solnik, J
Journal: WoundSource
Reviewed by: Cindy H. Duong, class of 2021, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

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Hy-Tape International's picture
Secondary Dressings

By Hy-Tape International, Inc.

Secondary dressings can be an effective tool to protect the primary dressing or provide additional functionality beyond the primary dressing. Hydrocolloid or foam dressings can provide protection for the wound area and manage excess exudate. However, they can also significantly add to the cost and time of wound care. This makes it critical that health care professionals implement effective practices to maximize the wear time of secondary dressings.

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Ivy Razmus's picture
Product Selection

by Ivy Razmus, RN, PhD, CWOCN

As we continually focus on improving our skills in prevention and management of skin and wounds, we are beginning to understand that one size does not fit all; or, in other words, prevention and management in wound care are dependent on the size and age of the patient. In wound care, one method of care does not fit all types of patients. Although those clinicians who work with younger populations know this to be true based on our personal experience, this can be a problem if the purchasing of products for younger patients' skin and wound care is decided without the input of the providers and caregivers who care for them.

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Margaret Heale's picture
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Clean Technique

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Having read a recent article on clean versus sterile dressing technique, commenting again on this issue seems highly appropriate. The conclusion of the paper essentially is that a clean technique for acute wound care does not affect the incidence of infection.1 There is insufficient evidence in the literature relating to chronic wound care. I particularly appreciated the comment that nurses need to decide which approach to have by using critical thinking skills. I was reminded of a visit to a patient to utilize a fancy new dressing that I had never used before.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Alginate: Highly absorptive, non-occlusive dressing derived from brown seaweed or kelp.

Antimicrobial dressing: Delivers a sustained release of antimicrobial agents to the wound, to eradicate bioburden.

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