Dressings

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Wound healing typically progresses through four phases: hemostasis, inflammation, cell proliferation or granulation and repair, and epithelialization and remodeling of scar tissue. Clinicians should achieve wound closure through a standardized framework such as the TIMERS (tissue management, infection or inflammation, moisture balance, edge or epithelialization, regeneration, and social factors) tool, which provides a comprehensive approach to wound management and optimizes the wound bed and conditions to support progression of wounds through the healing process.

Elizabeth Dechant's picture

Elizabeth Day Dechant, BSN, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

Diaper rash, more officially known as incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD), affects hospitalized and incontinent patients of all ages. In my years as a WOC Nurse in a pediatric hospital, IAD has been by far the most frequently treated condition. However, outside of a health care setting, IAD is the most common skin problem in infants and young children who are not yet toilet trained. Diaper rash has plagued babies and new parents for centuries, yet its treatment remains highly debated. For the purpose of this article, I am focusing on the prevention and treatment of diaper rashes in infants and young children, although the principles of topical treatment discussed here apply to all patients.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Chronic and nonhealing wounds are a worldwide issue and are becoming more difficult to treat. In the United States alone, according to Medicare, over 8 million Americans have chronic wounds that cost the national health care system between $18.1 and $96.8 billion per year. If standard treatment does not adequately heal a wound, additional methods of wound care treatment may be required, and the underlying disorder must be examined to determine the need for advanced wound care modalities. Advanced wound care therapies are interventions that are used after standard wound care has failed.

WoundSource Editors's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Moist wound healing is the current cost-effective, evidence-based modality to achieve faster wound healing rates and decreased pain and infection. As part of the wound healing process, acute wounds produce reparative exudates consisting of growth factors to support extracellular matrix production; in contrast, chronic wounds contain inflammatory-producing exudates studded with cytokines and proteases that may help maintain the inflammatory phase but can exert destructive effects on the fragile wound bed and may extend to the periwound surface.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

For the wound healing process to be successful, it must pass through four stages: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling or maturing. Wound healing requires inflammation, but it can be detrimental if it is persistent or encouraged by other factors, such as infection. It is during this phase that wound healing is most likely to stall.

Emily Greenstein's picture

By Emily Greenstein, APRN, CNP, CWON, FACCWS

After attending the Spring Symposium for Advanced Wound Care and hearing many great lectures, I got to thinking, “What are the pillars of chronic wound care?” We have all heard of the concept “look at the whole patient and not the hole in the patient.” Heck, I have even written about it. But we also need to have a good foundation for how to implement this phrase or where to even start. I did a quick Internet search and came up with some interesting articles that talked about the basics of wound care and management. I found discussions on everything from maintaining a moist wound environment to being financially responsible. All of this information leads me to the concept of developing easy-to-understand pillars or categories to consider when caring for a patient with a chronic wound.

Becky Naughton's picture

By Becky Naughton, RN, MSN, FNP-C, WCC

I’m sure we’ve all hit that point in our wound care careers where we’ve had that one patient who’s wound just doesn’t seem to respond to any treatment. You’ve tried everything that you can think of—state-of-the-art dressings, advanced cellular products, regular debridement, and even hyperbaric oxygen. But despite all of this, the wound seems stuck. This is what’s known as a recalcitrant wound, a wound that fails to progress through the phases of wound healing in a typical timeline and becomes “stuck.” A wound that does not decrease in size by 30% in 3 weeks or by 50% in 4 to 5 weeks is considered recalcitrant. This is significant because wounds that don’t show improvement in size by 50% in 4 weeks have a 91% chance of not healing in 12 weeks.

Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

It is important for nurses to strive toward excellence. Our patients deserve the best we are able to give, and sometimes we need to look critically at how we care and how we might improve outcomes. In theory, we update practice because we read research that indicates a change needs to be incorporated into what we do. More often, maybe we follow a colleague and like what we see, or the patient indicates a preference and we change an approach. It may be that a company representative visits and what they say makes sense, has the support of management, and we gladly (or not) incorporate a product into our practice. Looking at a standard of practice and reflecting on how we measure up require honesty and an openness that some might shy away from. Such reflective practice, combined with clinical supervision, leads to high-quality care and is an excellent method of reviewing, updating, and improving practice for patients with problems of the lower leg.

Cathy Wogamon-Harmon's picture

by Cathy L. Wogamon, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, CWON, CFCN

The periwound is generally defined as the area from the wound edge to 4 cm beyond circumferentially. Breakdown of the periwound can adversely affect wound healing even if the wound itself is doing well. After the initial assessment of the wound bed and edges, one should direct their assessment to the periwound. Generally speaking, there are three major conditions (other than intact) in which you may find the periwound: damaged from trauma, too moist, or in an inflammatory state.

It is well known that chronic and hard-to-heal wounds have created a global crisis. Delayed healing in these wounds is often associated with biofilm, and antimicrobial dressings can be effective in managing bioburden in chronic wounds. For the use of antimicrobial advanced wound care dressings to be successful in chronic wound care, however, clinicians must have practical knowledge of dressing formats and options, dressing indications and applications, the principles of antimicrobial stewardship, and care planning for specific wound types.

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