Wound Dressings

Beth Hawkins Bradley's picture

by Beth Hawkins Bradley RN, MN, CWON

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) has become standard of care for many wound types. Any clinician who works with NPWT dressings will report that a significant number of wounds will develop a malodor, commonly referred to as a “VAC stink.” In response to malodor, clinicians often opt to give the wound a NPWT holiday, which can delay wound closure. In thi article we will look at factors that contribute to malodor, and interventions that might reduce it.

Sue Hull's picture
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Part 3 in a series examining the reduction of facility costs and the continuation of quality care

For Part 1, Click Here
For Part 2, Click Here

by Sue Hull MSN, RN, CWOCN

Laurie Swezey's picture
wound tunneling, undermining

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Tunneling wounds can be difficult to heal and often take several weeks to months to close. The following will discuss tunneling wounds and how negative pressure wound therapy can be used to heal them.

Sue Hull's picture

Part 2 in a series examining the reduction of facility costs and the continuation of quality care

For Part 1, Click Here

by Sue Hull MSN, RN, CWOCN

Sue Hull's picture

Part 1 in a series examining the reduction of facility costs and the continuation of quality care

by Sue Hull MSN, RN, CWOCN

Remember W. Edwards Deming? We all learned about him in business management, right? He taught and demonstrated that systematic approaches were necessary to improve quality and control costs. Maybe I’m the only one, but I couldn’t really grasp how that principle could be applied to wound care.

Laurie Swezey's picture
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by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

There are more than 3,000 types of wound dressings available on the market today, and more are being launched every day. Although there are a number of protocols and algorithms available to help with the selection of wound dressings,1,2 and individual facilities are likely to have their own dressings of choice, the decision can still seem overwhelming. Even the most seasoned wound care practitioner can find it difficult to assess the advantages and disadvantages of each dressing available and to make the appropriate choice for a particular patient. Rather than consider each dressing in isolation, a useful technique can be to mentally place each type of dressing on a continuum of occlusion.3

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Michael Miller's picture

by Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY, PT. 8

“…(7) Go to, let us go down, and there confound their language, that they may not understand one another's speech.(8) So the Lord scattered them abroad from thence upon the face of all the earth: and they left off to build the city. (9)Therefore is the name of it called Babel..." (Genesis, Chap. 11).

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